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Tag: Rock (21-30 of 558)

Love it or loathe it? Two EW critics debate U2's new album 'Songs of Innocence'

u2

Yesterday, U2—easily the biggest rock band left on the planet—surprised everyone when they released their long-in-gestation new album for free.

Songs of Innocence was made available to everybody with an iTunes account, which allows most everybody who listens to digital music to hear it; a physical version will be out on October 14, at which point it will be eligible to chart.

After a solid 12 hours of digesting the record — their first since 2010’s generally disappointing No Line on the Horizon — EW music experts Kyle Anderson and Miles Raymer fired up their e-mail machines, and their critical judgment.  READ FULL STORY

Arum Rae delivers danceable, frills-free rock on 'Let's Shake'

When Berklee-trained singer-songwriter Arum Rae was being courted by a major label last year, the former Austin, Texas resident (currently located in Brooklyn) booked recording time for a demo with Jim Eno, the drummer and producer for Spoon who helped develop the punchy, minimalist aesthetic that’s become one of that band’s defining characteristics. The deal never came through, and Rae is now presenting the demos as an EP (her second this year) of “lost” recordings.

Waving Wild comes out Nov. 4. Its lead single, “Let’s Shake,” is a bracing, stripped-down, full-speed-ahead reminder that, oh yeah, rock ‘n’ roll is dance music at heart.

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Nick Cave talks to EW about his new movie '20,000 Days on Earth' and why he doesn't like meeting his heroes

Over the course of a nearly four-decade music career, Nick Cave has been one of music’s most reliably inscrutable rock stars. The forthcoming documentary 20,000 Days on Earth (in theaters September 19) does a bit to shed some light on Cave’s dark spirit, but it does it with a twist.

Although many of the day-in-the-life conversations aren’t scripted (or very loosely so), and everybody in Cave’s life—from bandmate Warren Ellis to former Bad Seed Blixa Bargeld to Kylie Minogue—plays him- or herself, a lot of the film is built on artifice. The office where Cave undergoes a therapy session, the “archive” where he goes to review old photographs—they’re all built sets and faked scenarios, and constructed to try to wring some truth out of something inherently fake.

20,000 Days on Earth splits its time between those scenes and in-the-studio footage from the sessions that led to Push the Sky Away, Cave’s 2013 record with the Bad Seeds. It’s a remarkable movie, existing in the unique dimension between fiction and reality straddled by filmmaking greats like Werner Herzog and Errol Morris: READ FULL STORY

Travel back to the late '90s with Puff Daddy's Smashing Pumpkins remix

The mid-to-late ’90s were a pretty weird time for music. Hip-hop, alternative rock, and dance music all found themselves suddenly, unexpectedly elevated from underground styles to the top of the pop charts, and it inspired a lot of musicians working in one of those styles to reach out to artists in the others. While today we take this sort of cross-genre collaboration for granted, at the time it was a fairly new concept. And as with most new concepts, there was a period where everyone was trying to figure out exactly what to do with it, resulting in a lot of awkward moments captured on tape.

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Hear Larkin Poe's stomping roots-pop single 'Don't'

Larkin Poe is a duo from Atlanta comprised of sisters Rebecca and Megan Lovell and named for a distant relative who was himself distantly related to Edgar Allen Poe. The sisters share an infatuation with roots sounds, frequently incorporating traditional song structures and instruments like the mandolin and Dobro into their music, but they also boast strong pop instincts. On Oct. 14, they’ll release their new album, Kin, in Restoration Hardware stores, with a broader release a week later. The first single, “Don’t,” pulls from rock’s earliest days, mixing it with a stomping glam rock beat and a country-inflected pop melody.

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Ty Segall talks about his new album and his work habits

In the span of just a few years, Ty Segall has put out seven albums, a handful of collaborative LPs, and so many singles, guest appearances, compilation tracks, and assorted other releases that even he’s probably lost count. His latest, Manipulator, was released this past Tuesday, almost exactly a year after his last album, Sleeper, a deeply personal and largely acoustic record about fraught family relationships. The new one finds him back in full-on rock mode, exploding with a generous amount of sweet hooks and heavy guitar riffing, and is equally capable of satisfying pop fans and van-driving, dope-smoking hard rockers alike.

In the lead-up to Manipulator’s release, EW got Segall on the phone to talk about the album, its inspiration, and how he manages to stay so prolific.

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Delta Spirit debut their sweeping video for 'From Now On'

delta-spirit

Delta Spirit have a talent for recreating the feel of classic rock styles–particularly the more psychedelic ones–without sticking too closely to their aesthetic playbooks, which is a remarkable quality in a rock scene that often seems to have traded innovation for making the most accurate emulations possible of sounds from the genre’s past. The lead single from their upcoming fourth album, Into the Wide (out Sept. 9 on Dualtone Records), has a widescreen scope but is still packed with hooks, especially in the searing bent-note lead that soars over the composition.

For the video, director Andrew Bruntel goes for a similarly epic sweep, with a disparate cast of characters living very diferent lives on the prairies of southeastern Colorado. “If I could parse it down to one simple theme,” he writes, “it would be vulnerability. Vulnerability in friendships, in our relationships with family and with the pets/animals that we allow into our lives.” It’s gorgeous and triumphant and sad all at the same time, much like the song itself.

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Hear The Clash's virtual reunion with EW's homemade Clash 'Black Album'

In one of the best and most talked-about sequences in Richard Linklater’s instant classic film Boyhood, Ethan Hawke gives Ellar Coltrane a homemade compilation he calls The Black Album. It consists of solo tracks from each of the four Beatles, sequenced in a way that captures the magic the band were able to make when they were still a cohesive unit. “Basically, I’ve put the band back together for you,” Hawke wrote in the liner notes.

It’s such a good idea that EW decided to steal it. There are countless bands who have broken up and never circled back around to a cash-grab reunion, and we’ve begun with one of my absolute favorites: The Clash. The group didn’t officially stick a fork in it until 1986, but the bloom was well off the rose by the time drummer Topper Headon left the group just prior to the release of 1982’s Combat Rock. The relationship between co-leads Mick Jones and Joe Strummer were hopelessly strained by the end, and by the time the group released the disastrous Cut the Crap in 1985, Jones was already deep into his second life as the frontman for Big Audio Dynamite.

Like the Beatles before them, the members of the Clash did make up and collaborate on an individual basis after they broke up, but they never got the band back together (and once Strummer suddenly passed away in 2002, that door was officially closed for good). Still, here are 19 tracks (the same number that appeared on the watershed London Calling) from the post-Clash lives of the core four that re-capture the spirit of what made them sonically and philosophically revolutionary.  READ FULL STORY

Meet Profound Lore Records founder Chris Bruni, the face of modern metal

Chris-Bruni

Next week sees the release of Foundations of Burden, the second album by Arkansas-bred doom metal band Pallbearer. Their first album, 2012’s Sorrow and Extinction, was a critically-beloved collection of heavy tunes that not only announced the arrival of a great act but also cemented Pallbearer’s label, Profound Lore Records, as the best source of new material for headbangers everywhere.

The 10-year-old label, based out of Kitchener, Ontario, has put out a staggeringly excellent series of releases by some of the best groups currently working in the extremely fertile metal underground. Just this year, Profound Lore has released stellar collections from Lord Mantis, the Atlas Moth, Alraune, Dead Congregation, and the Must List-approved Agalloch. Pallbearer comes out next week, with a new album by Witch Mountain not far behind. These bands dig deep into metal subgenres, conjuring up remarkable darkness via black metal, death metal, prog, hardcore, folk, and whatever else is available to get the turned-to-11 point across.

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Priory's 'Weekend' is keeping the arena-rock anthem alive

Recent pop history has been notably light on the kind of epically-scaled rock anthems built for fist-pumping, arena-shaking singalongs that dominated the radio throughout the ’80s and ’90s. Portland duo Priory is singlehandedly reversing that trend with their song “Weekend,” which for the past month has been slowly gaining momentum on radio and seems destined to go onto even bigger things.

Brandon Rush and Kyle Sears met at shows around Portland, but the idea to collaborate musically didn’t come until Rush moved into a punk house that Sears was living in. “We just sat down for the first time with acoustic guitars and it was kind of instantaneous,” Sears says. “Literally I think the first time we sat down we wrote the foundations for like two songs.”

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