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Tag: Rock (81-90 of 524)

Patti Smith remembers Lou Reed: 'He was our generation's New York poet'

The most remarkable aspect of the cavalcade of tributes that have been written in the wake of Lou Reed’s death last weekend is that just about everybody—including his collaborators and friends—has written about him with a genuine sense of awe. That’s how powerful and influential a personality Reed was, and that’s how deeply he touched those who were closest to him.

Such is the case with Patti Smith, Reed’s sometime friend and fellow downtown denizen. In a lovely, poetic tribute published by The New Yorker, Smith talks about hearing of Reed’s passing, reflecting on New York in the ’70s, and connecting him to a long cavalcade of poets. She talks with great passion about running across Reed while she was building the Patti Smith Group. “Within a few years, in that same room upstairs at Max’s, Lenny Kaye, Richard Sohl, and I presented our own land of a thousand dances,” she wrote. “Lou would often stop by to see what we were up to. A complicated man, he encouraged our efforts, then turned and provoked me like a Machiavellian schoolboy. I would try to steer clear of him, but, catlike, he would suddenly reappear, and disarm me with some Delmore Schwartz line about love or courage. I didn’t understand his erratic behavior or the intensity of his moods, which shifted, like his speech patterns, from speedy to laconic. But I understood his devotion to poetry and the transporting quality of his performances.”

Check out the entirety Smith’s remembrance at The New Yorker, and be sure to also read the tributes by Reed’s wife Laurie Anderson and friend and collaborator Lars Ulrich.

Spike Jonze previews this Sunday's YouTube Music Awards, featuring Eminem, Lady Gaga, and Arcade Fire

Director Spike Jonze has had a busy 2013: He produced Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa (currently the number one movie in the country), his next directorial effort Her is set to roll out at Christmas, and this Sunday, he’ll oversee the first ever YouTube Music Awards.

The show, which celebrates both high-octane stars and viral upstarts, will beam live from New York City’s Pier 36 and will feature performances by Eminem, Lady Gaga, and Arcade Fire. The whole thing will be hosted by Jason Schwartzman and Reggie Watts and will air live (naturally) on YouTube beginning at 6 p.m. Eastern on Sunday.

But what will the show actually look like, and how will it differentiate itself from the other music award shows crowding the calendar? Jonze spoke to EW about the process of putting it together, the goals for the evening, and more.

Entertainment Weekly: How long have you been working on this show? How did you get involved?
Spike Jonze: About six months ago, YouTube approached Vice and I about creating and producing their first music awards. It seemed like such a natural thing both for them and for me. I’ve always loved YouTube and the idea that anyone can make something and put it up. There’s no gatekeeper anymore—someone can just be creative and share it.

We came up with the idea that this night should be all about making things. So we’re giving awards to people who made things this year, but we’re also trying to make the whole awards show feel like a YouTube video. It’s about being creative and making things, and one of the main parts of that is we’re making live music videos with these artists, and as opposed to artists performing on a stage to an audience, though there might be some of that too if that’s the idea. It’s more about making these live videos in front of and with the audience that is there.

So will the artists be performing in full-scripted, narrative-type videos?
Some of them will be more straightforward performance videos, but some will be more conceptual. READ FULL STORY

Metallica's Lars Ulrich on Lou Reed: 'He's the most direct, pure person I've ever met'

After Lou Reed passed away last Sunday at the age of 71, we reached out to one of his friends and collaborators, Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich, who worked with him on his last major recording project, the 2011joint album LuluHe spoke to us about his first introduction to the Velvet Underground as a kid growing up in Denmark, their first meeting at an amusement park years later, and what working with Reed was like.

“My dad had a music room across from my room in the house I grew up in in Copenhagen, Denmark. There would be all kinds of crazy stuff coming out of there from the late ‘60s and early ‘70s: Hendrix, the Doors, Miles Davis, Janis Joplin, John Coltrane, all that kind of stuff. Among the things that came out of that room at that time was the Velvet Underground. I maybe wasn’t super aware of that when I was six years old, but a few years later we moved to America and [my Dad and I] started exchanging music that we were passionate about. I would sit there and play Iron Maiden or Motorhead, and he would play me some crazy stuff. And I remember we had some pretty next-level sessions with ‘Heroin’ and ‘Sweet Jane,’ and with Rock ‘n’ Roll Animal, some of that stuff. This was the first time I sat and got into it on a different level, probably around 1980 or 1981.

So obviously that type of stuff had a tremendous impact. I wasn’t quite in tune with the cultural impact of the New York scene and what it all meant, but as a musical relationship, it was very rich, and I loved what I was hearing and I connected with what I was hearing. Some people will talk about ‘the forefather of punk music’ and all that type of stuff. I wasn’t able to put it together in that type of context at that time because I was only 16, but those were the first couple of times I experienced Lou. READ FULL STORY

David Bowie drops creepy 'Love Is Lost' video for Halloween: Watch it here

David Bowie knows a thing or two about being spooky—he did, after all, title one of his albums Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) – and he’s also responsible for this deeply unsettling video for “The Heart’s Filthy Lesson.”

Now he’s back with a Lynchian new clip for “Love Is Lost (Hello Steve Reich Mix),” a reimagining of one of the best tracks on his 2013 comeback album The Next Day. The remix is care of former LCD Soundsystem mastermind James Murphy, who is having a pretty good week all things considered (he also co-produced Arcade Fire’s just-released new album Reflektor).

According to the press release, the entire thing was constructed last weekend in Bowie’s Manhattan apartment, and cost $12.99 total—the price of the thumb drive Bowie had to pick up to transfer the finished video.

“Love Is Lost (Hello Steve Reich Mix)” is one of several new tracks that will appear on The Next Day Extra, a deluxe edition of Bowie’s latest album. The three-disc set features the original record along with a second disc of bonus tracks and remixes and a DVD of the videos from The Next Day. It’ll be available November 5.

Check out the clip below. It’s a nice bit of mid-morning creepiness to kick off your Halloween. And seriously, watch “The Heart’s Filthy Lesson” too.

READ FULL STORY

Kanye and Lindsay Lohan drop in on Thirty Seconds to Mars' 'City of Angels' video: Watch it here

Jared Leto is getting serious awards-related attention for his performance in the about-to-be-released film The Dallas Buyers ClubBut the actor is also, famously, a musician and a filmmaker (he directs under the name Bartholomew Cubbins), and it’s those skills he applies to the new short film that accompanies the Thirty Seconds to Mars song “City of Angels.”

The song, from the soundtrack to The Dallas Buyers Club, is a tribute to Los Angeles, and the 11-minute film features testimonials from from a variety of L.A. denizens, including Kanye West, Lindsay Lohan, Selena Gomez, James Franco, Corey Feldman, Alan Cumming, Los Angeles Lakers guard Steve Nash, and a handful of celebrity impersonators and street performers. The key quote? Kanye West declares “Fame is f—ing awesome!”

Watch the whole thing below, and don’t forget to stream the entirety of the excellent soundtrack to The Dallas Buyers Club

READ FULL STORY

'Dallas Buyers Club' soundtrack: Hear new songs from Tegan and Sara, Neon Trees, My Morning Jacket and more - EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE

Dallas-Buyers-Club-soundtrack.jpg

One of this fall’s most anticipated movies, The Dallas Buyers Club, tells the true story of Texas native Ron Woodroof (Matthew McConaughey), whose 1986 HIV diagnosis, received in an era before treatment was readily available, spurred him to start his own prescription drug-smuggling ring.

The movie, which also stars Jared Leto, Steve Zahn, and Jennifer Garner, doesn’t open until this Friday, November 1, but you can stream the soundtrack exclusively here today. The album features brand new compositions by the likes of Tegan and Sara, My Morning Jacket, Fitz and the Tantrums, Neon Trees, Cold War Kids, and Leto’s own band Thirty Seconds to Mars. The album kicks off with Shuggie Otis’ stoned-soul anthem “Sweet Thang,” and also includes two classic T. Rex songs.

If you buy the album on iTunes (where it goes on sale today), 40 cents of every sale will go to the AIDS relief charity Project (RED)‘s Global Fund.  Jared Leto will be taking over Project (RED)’s Twitter account today at 11:30 AM Eastern/8:30 AM Pacific to answer questions about the movie, the soundtrack, and AIDS awareness.

Listen to the full album below: READ FULL STORY

The Avett Brothers talk about their new album, explain who's the 'Magpie' and who's the 'Dandelion'

North Carolina folk-rockers The Avett Brothers recently released their eighth full-length album, Magpie and the Dandelion — which is also their third effort with super-producer Rick Rubin, who worked with them on their breakout hit “I And Love And You.” Led by single “Another Is Waiting,” whose video premiered here on EW.com, Magpie debuted at No. 5 on Billboard 200, giving the banjo-plucking troupe their second straight Top 5 debut.

A few weeks before the album’s release, EW caught up with the band before a PBS taping at the McCittrick Hotel. Bassist Bob Crawford couldn’t participate in the interview, but brothers Seth and Scott Avett sat down with us to talk about their new music, their bird obsession, how Crawford’s young daughter is doing (she was diagnosed with cancer in 2012), and what the title Magpie and the Dandelion means.

Why are you releasing an album just a year after The Carpenter?
Scott Avett: It used to be commonplace for us. We were hard on ourselves early on. We felt obligated to put something out every year. That felt very appropriate for some reason. So the material presented itself — we realized it was there.

You’d recorded it already?
Scott: Yeah, we’d recorded most of it with The Carpenter, not thinking it would come out as an album necessarily, but maybe it would come out as singles or extra material or what not. The more we listened to it, the more we realized there was a piece, a whole there that deserved to be together and synchronized. READ FULL STORY

Enter Snowman: Metallica's next gig will be in Antarctica

Last month, Metallica crossed two more items off their collective bucket list when they released their first ever theatrical concert film and then headlined a show at the Apollo Theater in New York City. Now it seems they are going to hit a trifecta in 2013: The band announced yesterday that they will be playing a show in Antarctica.

“After over 30 years as a band, we have been unbelievably fortunate to visit just about every corner of the earth . . . except for one,” the group wrote on its official website. “That is all about to change as we are set travel to Antarctica, the only continent that Metallica has never played on until now!”

The show will be part of a contest through Coca-Cola Zero that is unfortunately only open to fans in a handful of Latin American countries (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Mexico) and will be the culmination of a week-long cruise. In addition to being staged on the Earth’s most desolate continent, it will also feature a new approach to performance that should make for some awesomely weird cell phone videos. “We’ll be playing inside a dome on the base and in another twist, the show will be transmitted to the audience via headphones with no amplification . . . a real first for us!” The show will also be streamed online, just in case you can’t go on a Metallica-themed cruise or don’t live in Costa Rica.

Metallica are no strangers to the cold—they headlined the extremely strange Molson Ice Polar Beach Party in 1995, which was held way up north in Canada.

The contest opens October 28, so if you’re in one of those above-mentioned countries, you can enter the contest here.

Here’s a question: What band would you literally go to the ends of the Earth to see?

Lost Kurt Cobain interview from 1993 features his thoughts on Aerosmith and feminism

Though he had all the makings of a proper recluse, Kurt Cobain actually submitted himself to a surprising number of interviews over the course of his too-brief career.

And no two were alike, because nobody ever knew which version of the Nirvana frontman would show up. The acid-tongued cultural critic? The in-joking goofball? The shy suffering artist? The sweet family man? They were all part and parcel to the Cobain experience.

In a recently unearthed interview from 1993 conducted by British journalist Jon Savage and animated by PBS’ new Blank on Blank shingle, each one of those Kurts shows up for a minute or two.

There’s some stuff that has come up in conversations in the past, like the idea that Cobain thought at one time that he might be gay, and details about his various stomach ailments. But there’s also a fun bit about looking for the roots of the name Cobain, what annoys him about Aerosmith records, and how he felt about becoming a father.

Listen below: READ FULL STORY

Paramore's Hayley Williams on touring, Zedd, and fighting

Paramore have hit a lot of milestones this year: They released their first album as a trio, scored their first entry into the radio top 10 with the single “Still Into You,” and are about to embark on their biggest arena tour yet—including their first headlining spot at New York’s Madison Square Garden.

The trek kicks off tomorrow night in Seattle (complete dates are here), but before she packed for the road, singer Hayley Williams took some time out to talk about the new run, the damage done during the “Still Into You” video, and how she ended up on Zedd’s “Stay the Night.”

Entertainment Weekly: You’ve been at this a while, but these are some of the biggest rooms you’ve ever played coming up on this tour. Do you still get nervous?
Hayley Williams: I still get nervous. I get nervous before every show, even if it’s small. I just want everything to be perfect. We’re sort of perfectionists until we get out there, and then once we get out there, anything goes. I have really big butterflies — I’m kind of freaking out about all these rooms. I’m really excited and, like, throwing up in my mouth about Madison Square Garden.

So what sort of show are you putting on in Madison Square Garden?
Have you ever seen that war scene in Metallica’s show? We’re not doing that. [Laughs] We have never actually done a big production. We generally tend to show up on stage with our gear and a backdrop and some pretty lights. So we put a lot more thought into this show. The set list is longer; we’re playing almost two hours every night. I feel so old—I cannot believe we’re playing two hours a night! But when we’re playing it goes by so fast for me. READ FULL STORY

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