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Tag: Soundtracks (1-10 of 237)

The Lorde-curated 'Hunger Games' soundtrack features Chvrches, Charli XCX, more

When news broke that Lorde would be curating the Hunger Games soundtrack, expectations were high: The 17-year-old broke out in 2013 with “Royals” and has been releasing hit after hit from her debut album ever since. But now the soundtrack’s tracklist is out, and it doesn’t disappoint.

CHVRCHES, Charli XCX, Tinashe, Bat for Lashes, and Lorde herself are among the artists featured on the 14-track album. Songs include Lorde’s “Yellow Flicker Beat,” a single she premiered in September, and The Chemical Brothers’ “This Is Not a Game,” which began floating around on the internet Monday. READ FULL STORY

Hear Chvrches' 'Get Away,' from the new 'Drive' soundtrack

Drive‘s soundtrack was already great enough with its synth-heavy tracks and ethereal vocals, but now it’s getting a makeover: With the help of musicians like Banks and Bastille, BBC Radio 1’s Zane Lowe is rescoring the 2011 Ryan Gosling film.

Most of the tracks will be made specifically for the project by artists including Jon Hopkins, FOALS, Laura Mvula, and the 1975. Though the entire soundtrack will premiere on BBC Three Oct. 30, Chvrches debuted their contribution a bit early: Monday, the Scottish trio released “Get Away,” a pulsing pop song that would fit right in on their 2013 album, The Bones of What You Believe.

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Trent Reznor on the 'Gone Girl' music, working with David Fincher, and translating David Lynch

Gone Girl is celebrating its second straight week as the number one movie in the country, and one of the secrets of director David Fincher’s spell-casting is his partnership with Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, who have provided the scores to Fincher’s last three films.

Reznor and Ross, whose day job as Nine Inch Nails has given them plenty of practice creating creepy soundscapes, have a somewhat unusual way of working: Instead of writing music specifically to finished scenes, they read the script and take input from Fincher about tone, and then craft a series of thematic pieces that are then inserted into the action.

“It’s like dressing a set,” Reznor says. “What feels like it belongs in that space? What feels like Missouri? What feels like erosion of this relationship? What feels like a real ugly thing hidden beneath the surface, with a nice paint job on the outside? It might feel pretty, but it’s spoiled under the surface.” READ FULL STORY

Hear 'Immortals,' Fall Out Boy's song from the 'Big Hero 6' soundtrack

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It may not be quite as catchy as the songs from Disney’s last animated hit, Frozen, but Big Hero 6 will feature at least one original song courtesy of Fall Out Boy.

Titled “Immortals,” the track will be featured in the film, and it seems perfectly suited to a montage showing off the powers of Hiro Hamada and his high-tech team of heroes.

Fall Out Boy released the full song on its YouTube page.

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Andre Benjamin on Jimi Hendrix, OutKast, and what's next

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The André Benjamin drought is over. After a long break from the spotlight, the man also known as Andre 3000 not only launched a headline-making reunion tour with his formative rap duo this ­summer but also stars in the excellent Hendrix biopic Jimi: All Is by My Side, written and directed by Oscar-winning 12 Years a Slave screenwriter John Ridley. Thoughtful and forthcoming, Benjamin, 39, spoke via phone from his home in Atlanta about the evolution of Jimi and what takes to be true to the parts he plays both on stage and off.

EW: You’ve been trying to play Jimi Hendrix for a while. What drew you into this script?
André Benjamin: The take that John Ridley devised. I’ve been kind of close to or attached to a few different Hendrix projects over the years. 15 years ago, I started hearing the Hendrix calls from different directors and producers. I’ve read about four or five different scripts—great scripts, at that—but for some reason or another they just didn’t get made. When John Ridley came with this take, years later I’m like, “Wow, I’m pretty old at this point, but if you still feel like it can work…” And John was really, really into it. The first thing he said was, “I’m going to make this movie, and I want you to be in it.” I was just going off of John’s energy. READ FULL STORY

'WKRP in Cincinnati' is getting a DVD release with its original music

WKRP in Cincinnati‘s defining qualities were a cast of wacky characters, an atmosphere of free-floating late-’70s psychic malaise (that on its better episodes the show sharpened to a cutting point), and, more than anything else, by its music. Fittingly for a show about a radio station of the time, the soundtrack included everything from the Grateful Dead to the Cars, often highlighting the culture clash between hippie-era dinosaurs and the leaner New Wave acts that were springing up in response to those dinosaurs’ refusal to exit the pop zeitgeist.

Thanks to the way music licensing contracts were written at the time, the show lost its rights to use the original versions of the songs it had so deeply woven into its fabric, and was forced to replace them with generic knockoffs while it was still in broadcast syndication. Later, when it moved to cable and home video it did so with the same soundalikes.

On Oct. 28, Shout! Factory will release the first complete series-spanning WKRP DVD set, with its original soundtrack gloriously restored. (Orders through the Shout! Factory site get early delivery on Sept. 23.) The 13-disc set will include not only new bonus features (including a 2014 panel discussion with members of the cast and crew), but actual songs by a staggeringly broad range of artists including Captain Beefheart, Elvis Costello, the Rolling Stones, Luther Vandross, Ray Charles, the Sir Douglas Quintet, and Huey Lewis & the News. Somewhere in sitcom heaven Johnny Fever and Venus Flytrap are exchanging cool ’70s-hipster handshakes.

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Nick Cave talks to EW about his new movie '20,000 Days on Earth' and why he doesn't like meeting his heroes

Over the course of a nearly four-decade music career, Nick Cave has been one of music’s most reliably inscrutable rock stars. The forthcoming documentary 20,000 Days on Earth (in theaters September 19) does a bit to shed some light on Cave’s dark spirit, but it does it with a twist.

Although many of the day-in-the-life conversations aren’t scripted (or very loosely so), and everybody in Cave’s life—from bandmate Warren Ellis to former Bad Seed Blixa Bargeld to Kylie Minogue—plays him- or herself, a lot of the film is built on artifice. The office where Cave undergoes a therapy session, the “archive” where he goes to review old photographs—they’re all built sets and faked scenarios, and constructed to try to wring some truth out of something inherently fake.

20,000 Days on Earth splits its time between those scenes and in-the-studio footage from the sessions that led to Push the Sky Away, Cave’s 2013 record with the Bad Seeds. It’s a remarkable movie, existing in the unique dimension between fiction and reality straddled by filmmaking greats like Werner Herzog and Errol Morris: READ FULL STORY

Stream Stuart Murdoch's 'God Help the Girl' original soundtrack

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For the past few years, indie auteur Stuart Murdoch has been splitting his energies between his usual gig leading Belle and Sebastian and a project called God Help the Girl. It started out as an experiment in which Murdoch and the rest of his group backed a cast of female singers he recruited through an ad in a Glasgow magazine, but since releasing a self-titled LP in 2009, the venture has grown considerably more ambitious.

Sept. 5 will see the release of a God Help the Girl film, written and directed by Murdoch. Starring Emily Browning, Olly Alexander, Hannah Murray, and Pierre Boulanger, it expands on Murdoch’s long-standing fascination with impeccably vintage-attired, romantically entangled young people in Glasgow. It has a strong musical aspect, as you might expect, and the soundtrack is comprised of previous GHTG recordings, new recordings sung by the film’s cast, with dialogue and score woven throughout, helping to underline the overall project’s leaky boundaries when it comes to format.

Hear our hypothetical 'Guardians of the Galaxy' Awesome Mix Vol. 2

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Guardians of the Galaxy‘s soundtrack figures so prominently in the film that it almost qualifies as a supporting character.

Throughout the movie, it provides hooks for jokes and action sequences and establishes a few important moments between its primary characters. The fact that it’s all supposed to be coming from a tape made for Peter Quill by his mother before she died—and before he was whisked away from Earth by aliens—underlines the loneliness that defines him. And it’s also just really good at doing what a soundtrack’s supposed to do, bolstering the movie’s rambunctious oddball energy with a bunch of vintage soft rock and soul songs that were, for the most part, considered throwaway pop tunes when they were released. In other words, just like the story’s protagonists, these songs are misfits.

Spoiler alert: At the end of the movie, Peter finds out that he’s been unknowingly carrying around a sequel to the Awesome Mix Vol. 1 tape. Presumably, we’ll hear what’s on it in the GOTG sequel—but honestly, that’s a really long wait. Using director James Gunn’s interview about the soundtrack at Vulture as a guide, here’s a hypothetical Awesome Mix Vol. 2, assembled using same method Gunn employed for Vol. 1: choosing hits from the ’70s Billboard charts that aren’t quite important enough to have entered the pop pantheon, and favoring the kind of lightweight, slightly funky stuff that defined AOR radio back then. (We also included a couple of songs he’d picked for GOTG that didn’t make the final cut.)

At 18 songs, it’s longer by half than the official soundtrack—but let’s presume that Peter’s mother had access to 60-minute cassette tapes and didn’t want to short him.

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'Sharknado 2' director Anthony C. Ferrante on creating the movie's 'silly' theme song

Anthony C. Ferrante didn’t just direct Syfy’s Sharknado 2: The Second One: He also composed and sang on the TV movie’s theme song, “(The Ballad of) Sharknado.”

Ferrante had trouble getting rights to music for the Sharknado movies because of budgetary restraints, so he and his musically inclined friend Robbie Rist formed the band Quint for the sole purpose of creating Sharknado theme music. Quint’s not the first time the pair recorded songs together though; Ferrante and Rist compose the music for each of the director’s films.

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