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Tag: Spacehog (1-4 of 4)

Summerland Tour preview: Everclear's Art Alexakis on playing the hits and choosing food over sex

In 1995, Everclear released their second album Sparkle & Fade, which not only contained the band’s breakout hit “Santa Monica” but also a ruggedly dreamy composition called “Summerland.” Nearly two decades later, Summerland is more than just a song. It’s a franchise, and it serves as the name of Everclear frontman Art Alexakis’ touring mini-festival, which is about to kick off its third consecutive year on the road (and fourth overall). Starting this Friday, June 13, in Pompano Beach, FL, Everclear will take Soul Asylum, Eve 6, and Spacehog across North America for a healthy series of doses of alt-rock nostalgia. “These are still real bands,” Alexakis notes. “They’re not bands coming out of the mothballs to play the hits. That’s the difference between our tour and some of the other ‘90s tours. If that’s what you want to see, that’s totally cool, but that’s my thing. A lot of those bands are starting to sound like karaoke bands. I want to hear rock bands.”

Enjoy EW’s conversation with Alexakis about the new trappings of rock stardom below, and check out the official Summerland site for the full list of tour dates.

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Spacehog's Royston Langdon on getting the band back together, auditioning for Velvet Revolver, and one fateful motorcycle ride

If you remember 1995, you remember the neo-glam modern-rock radio smash “In the Meantime” — and the band that made it, the Langdon-brothers-helmed Spacehog.

After the breakout success of their debut, Resident Alien, the group followed with a critically-beloved cult classic, The Chinese Album, that failed to catch on commercially, and then The Hogyssey before going their separate ways. Along the way, they experimented with different bands, went over rocky personal paths (including frontman Royston Langdon’s marriage and subsequent divorce from actress Liv Tyler), and generally tried to find their way.

Now older and wiser but still obsessed with glam sweetness, Spacehog are back. They released their long-awaited fourth album As It Is on Earth last month, and they’re currently on the road in support of it. EW caught up with frontman Royston Langdon to discuss his long hiatus, how he nearly became the singer of Velvet Revolver, and how he feels about “In the Meantime” nearly two decades later.

Entertainment Weekly: The Hogyssey came out all the way back in 2001. How did Spacehog dissipate?
Royston Langdon: It was a lot of things. We’d spent a lot of time touring intensely for the first two or three years, after the release of Resident AlienThe Chinese Album came pretty easily and was a similar kind of experience to the first record, and it was pretty critically well-received but not so well-received commercially. So then we spent some time in the wilderness without a label. When we finally made The Hogyssey, there was a lot of creative differences with the label and within the group. I’ve never really been happy with that record, so touring that record in 2001 was hard work. We were pulling in all different directions, which is not good for a band. Our show final show was supposed to be on the eighth of September in 2011. READ FULL STORY

What is the best '90s alt-rock one-hit wonder?

Earlier this week, the brand new reissue of Blind Melon’s self-titled debut album arrived in the EW offices. After giving it a few spins and discussing its worth, a handful of us in the music department came to the same conclusion many of us did back when this thing first landed in record stores: It’s terrible. “No Rain” is the only good song on there, and “No Rain” is just the worst.

However, a lot of people will defend “No Rain” simply because of nostalgia. If you’re in your late 20s or early 30s now, it’s entirely possible that “No Rain” was in super-heavy rotation when you first discovered MTV, and even if you didn’t like the song, it’s certainly a part of you now. There’s plenty of ’90s canonization going on right now, partially based on the fact that the people who were in high school in 1998 now have all of the disposable income, and partially because the Internet has made it way easier for artists well past their maximum saturation points to hold onto the fans who could develop into lifers.

Thus, we’ve been getting comebacks from ’90s icons of all sorts, from New Kids on the Block and the Backstreet Boys to Lisa Loeb and everybody on those Sugar Ray package tours. Of course, the great artists from that era have stuck with us (or moved on to other, better projects), but there are a handful of welcome comebacks, including Spacehog.

After some time spent on side projects and re-charging some batteries, Spacehog are back with a new album called As It Is On Earth coming out on April 16, and they played a tiny cobweb-shaking show at New York’s Mercury Lounge last month. I always loved them—as a huge fan of David Bowie, I always enjoyed their glam-centric approach to alt-rock.

They always deserved to be bigger than they were, but their one famous contribution to radio culture, “In the Meantime,” holds up exceptionally well. It manages to successfully merge sci-fi soul with post-grunge radio crunch, and the hook is absolutely killer. Before the show, I was with a few friends of mine at a bar, and somebody else queued up “In the Meantime” on the jukebox. As we listened to it there, and then a second time at the show, my friend turned to me and said, “This very well might be the best one-hit wonder of the ’90s.”

He may in fact be right (it’s certainly better than “No Rain”), but in order to come to some kind of conclusion, it’s necessary to examine some of the other contenders and to apply a little bit of science. READ FULL STORY

Spacehog return with 'Wish You Well': Hear it here - EXCLUSIVE

Back in 1995, Spacehog—four dudes from England who formed a band in New York City—landed on the rock moonscape with “In the Meantime,” one of the greatest alt-rock singularities of the post-Cobain radio universe.

Bathed in glammy goodness and sleek ’70s swagger, “In the Meantime” set the tone for Spacehog’s debut album, Resident Alien, which contained much more of the same. Along with the band’s sophomore release The Chinese Album, Spacehog crafted one of the most underrated discographies of the end of the last century.

They haven’t made an album since 2001′s The Hogyssey, and after a long hiatus and a handful of side projects, the group has returned with their fourth album As It Is On Earth, which will be released on April 16. In reuniting with producer Bryce Goggin (who helmed their ’90s output), the band has recreated the same kind of star-kissed energy that they brought on their debut.

Listen to “Wish You Well” exclusively below, and do your own judging:

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