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Tag: Spotify (11-20 of 53)

Calvin Harris, Iggy Azalea top Spotify's lists of songs of the summer

The question of what the song of the summer for 2014 has been a matter of much debate amongst critics, with a broad assortment of nominations made on varying combinations of chart placement, radio rotation, intuition, and straight-up voodoo. On Thursday, Spotify contributed some much-needed hard data into the argument with lists tabulating the most played songs on the streaming platform from June 1 to Aug. 31.

Globally, the most popular song on Spotify this summer was Calvin Harris’ “Summer,” which racked up 160 million streams over the three months across a 40 million-person user base. Overall, dance music performed strongly around the world, with Clean Bandit and Jess Glynne’s “Rather Be” and David Guetta’s “Bad” mixed in with more pop-oriented singles like Iggy Azalea’s two chart-dominating hits, “Fancy” and “Problem,” and Magic!’s “Rude.”

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The music streaming wars are starting to heat up

The past decade of music retail have been dominated by two things: the MP3 and Apple. But an ever-expanding field of new digital platforms are changing all of that by offering huge libraries of music available in all-you-can-eat plans — which make the idea of buying MP3s suddenly seem as outdated as buying CDs seemed when the first iPod dropped in 2001. There’s a war brewing over the market for music streaming, as well as the subscription fees these companies are hoping you’ll pay for it. As industry giants like Apple and Amazon have begun joining the battle, things are starting to heat up.

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Avicii tops Spotify's inaugural Top 25 Artists Under 25 list

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Spotify listeners really, really like Avicii.

The EDM star leads Spotify’s first-ever Top 25 Artists Under 25 list, a ranking of the most influential young music-makers. The streaming service looked at No. 1 hits, volume and growth of streams and shares, and viral chart success from the last year to compile the results.

Avicii easily took the top spot — the 24-year-old Swedish DJ’s track “Wake Me Up” is the most-streamed song in Spotify history. He’s also the first artist under 25 to reach one billion streams on the site. READ FULL STORY

Eat the Beat: The tastiest songs about food

With the release of her new album Food last week, singer and Le Cordon Bleu-certified chef Kelis has gone from “Milkshake” to full-on smorgasbord — tracks on the album include “Jerk Ribs,” “Cobbler” “Friday Fish Fry,” and “Biscuits n’ Gravy.”

But she’s hardly the first artist to find her muse on a menu. Place your order below—and stream our full food playlist (minus a few songs that weren’t available on Spotify; apologies to fans of both Pumpkins and egg-based condiments): READ FULL STORY

Spring playlist with Banks, Sam Smith, Lo-Fang and more: Listen now

Shake off a long, cold winter with these breezy new tracks from artists on the verge—slinky singers, bedroom R&B auteurs, and FoLs (Friends of Lorde).

Sam Smith, “Money on My Mind”
The Londoner’s swinging track—already a U.K. smash—pairs his aching voice with a groove fit for an energy-drink-stocked cocktail lounge. (It also helped nab him a slot on SNL.)

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Spotify slashes price to $5 for college kids

Spotify is wooing U.S. college students with a $5-a-month premium music deal, half off the regular rate.

It hopes to entice a generation of music lovers that is more likely to stream music than buy CDs to pay for better features and mobile access.

The $5 monthly service announced Tuesday applies to students of post-secondary institutions eligible for federal aid programs, including two-year colleges and vocational schools. The price reverts to normal after graduation.

Jeff Levick, Spotify’s chief marketing and revenue officer, says a similar program in Britain has increased the number of paying Spotify customers over the last year.

He says Spotify is focused on people aged 18-24 because they make up the largest group of users and grew up streaming music rather than paying for song downloads.

SXSW Music 2014: 20 acts to see

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The annual South By Southwest festival/conference/conventio-con is underway, with the music getting started in earnest on Tuesday and rolling headlong through Saturday night.

This year’s event has its share of big name visitors: Lady Gaga will be delivering the keynote address and performing, and the likes of Coldplay, Kendrick Lamar, Soundgarden, and Pitbull will be headlining a series of shows as part of the iTunes Festival.

But SXSW was originally designed as a showcase for new music, a place where baby bands could get their first big taste of exposure and where those artists who were about to break finally actually broke. EW will be on the ground covering acts both big and small, including these 20 on-the-cusp artists we’re going out of our way to check out.

Temples: Throwback psychedelia is hard to do, but this British quartet blends just the right amount of crushing beauty and off-kilter left turns.

Angel Olsen: In the grand tradition of PJ Harvey, Olsen marries muscular guitar with her delicate warble for blow-away blasts of folk-rock and power blues.

Perfect Pussy: Despite their censor-baiting name (and what honestly seems like a pretty standard-issue fuzz-punk sound), there’s a lot of buzz on this Syracuse foursome.

Sleepy Kitty: For fans of Sleigh Bells — but sub in post-grunge jangle for noisecore.

Cloud Nothings: Noisy Cleveland-based anarchists nearly made it big with their exceptional 2012 album Attack on Memory. Could the bigger, badder, forthcoming Here and Nowhere Else put them over the top?

Vertical Scratchers: Ultra-fuzzy indie jangle care of a pair of blissed out Californians.

SKATERS: Four New Yorkers who split the difference between driving punk surges and carefully-curated sonic tapestries, all wrapped in a whatever-man sneer.

ScHoolboy Q: Sure, he topped the charts with his latest album OxyMoron, but the top lieutenant in Kendrick Lamar’s army is ready to take the next step into household name-ness.

Chet Faker: The Australian’s downtempo bedroom R&B that would swerve dangerously into the cheese lane were it not for bearded mastermind Nick Murphy’s convincingly syrupy baritone.

You Blew It!: Don’t look now, but an emo revival is about to kick into gear, and this Orlando-based combo are the finest purveyors of the new pollution.

Oh Honey: Nothing but positive jams for this strummy, soulful Brooklyn duo. Like Matt & Kim with better production values.

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Staff Picks: Stream our January playlist featuring Broken Bells, Angel Haze, Black Lips and more

Pop’s superstars may be busy picking out their Grammy outfits, but a relatively quiet post-holiday release time just means there’s more room for lesser-known names (and a few old-school alt icons) in our headphones.

Read on to stream some of our favorite songs from the likes of Stephen Malkmus, Mø, Dum Dum Girls, Sevyn Streeter, St. Vincent, Mogwai and more — all from just-released or upcoming albums.

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Led Zeppelin finally join Spotify

It’s a battle nevemore: Led Zeppelin has finally joined Spotify. The rock icons announced today announced that their Swan Song/Atlantic catalog is now available for streaming on Spotify.

Right now, it’s just the band’s first two albums, Led Zeppelin and Led Zeppelin II. More will be released at midnight local time each day through Sunday, December 15, when the full catalog will be live.

Find the release schedule below:

•    Wednesday, December 11 – Led Zeppelin (1969) and Led Zeppelin II (1969)
•    Thursday, December 12 – Led Zeppelin III (1970) and  untitled fourth album (1971)
•    Friday, December 13 – Houses Of The Holy (1973) and Physical Graffiti (1975)
•    Saturday, December 14 – Presence (1976) and In Through The Out Door (1979)
•    Sunday, December 15 – The Song Remains The Same (1976), Coda (1982), BBC Sessions (1997),
How The West Was Won (2003), Mothership (2007), and Celebration Day (2012)

Radiohead's Thom Yorke angry about Spotify compensation, pulls music from streaming service

Another day, another English musician getting upset over his compensation from a streaming service.

Following in the footsteps of the gentlemen from Pink Floyd, Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke took umbrage with the amount of money paid to artists who allow their music on Spotify. “Make no mistake new artists you discover on #Spotify will no get paid,” Yorke tweeted. “Meanwhile shareholders will shortly being rolling in it. Simples.”

Yorke engaged in a Twitter exchange with his longtime producer and collaborator Nigel Godrich, who tweeted, “We’re off of Spotify. Can’t do that no more man. Small meaningless rebellion.”

That means that Spotify customers can no longer stream Yorke’s 2006 solo album The Eraser, the first album from Godrich’s Ultraista project, or the Atoms For Peace album Amok. “The reason is that new artists get paid f— all with this model. It’s an equation that just doesn’t work,” Godrich wrote on Twitter. “Meanwhile small labels and new artists can’t even keep their lights on. It’s just not right.”

More and more musicians have been speaking up about streaming services, who continually swear that their compensation packages are fair. In the eyes of Yorke and Godrich, services like Spotify (or Pandora, another frequent adversary of musicians) devalue the product created by artists.

Yorke drove that point home in his most recent tweet: “For me In Rainbows was a statement of trust. People still value new music,” he wrote, referencing the album his band released as a pay-what-you-want download back in 2007. “That’s all we’d like from Spotify. Don’t make us the target.”

UPDATE: Spotify released a statement in response to Yorke and Godrich’s tweets:

“Spotify’s goal is to grow a service which people love, ultimately want to pay for, and which will provide the financial support to the music industry necessary to invest in new talent and music,” a company spokesperson said today.

“We want to help artists connect with their fans, find new audiences, grow their fan base and make a living from the music we all love.

“Right now we’re still in the early stages of a long-term project that’s already having a hugely positive effect on artists and new music. We’ve already paid US$500M to rightsholders so far and by the end of 2013 this number will reach US$1bn. Much of this money is being invested in nurturing new talent and producing great new music.

“We’re 100% committed to making Spotify the most artist-friendly music service possible, and are constantly talking to artists and managers about how Spotify can help build their careers.”

What do you think? What will the tipping point be for Spotify and other streaming services? Do you believe there is a way for everybody to be fairly compensated while still delivering the same service?

Read More on EW.com:
Reassessing Radiohead
Pink Floyd writes an open letter on streaming services titled ‘Pandora’s Internet radio royalty ripoff’
Daft Punk breaks Spotify record, beat previous Mumford record

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