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Tag: Taylor Swift (1-10 of 230)

The Breakdown: Ed Sheeran's 'x' influences, by the numbers

This week’s biggest new release is British singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran’s x. Sheeran’s songwriting work for Taylor Swift and One Direction and acoustic pop style have earned him a fan base that’s heavy on younger listeners, but x (which is apparently meant to be pronounced “multiply”) deals with more mature themes, like the alienation that comes with fame and life on the road, as well as the ways sexual and chemical diversions can get away from you. People seem to be digging his new grown-up persona–our Melissa Maerz gave the album a B.

For this installment of the Breakdown we’ll take x apart and figure out what it’s made of. READ FULL STORY

Taylor Swift made a Drake-themed needlepoint for Ed Sheeran -- VIDEO

The persk of having Taylor Swift as a best friend: In a sneak peak at MTV’s new documentary 9 Days and Nights of Ed Sheeran, the English crooner can be seen showing off a needlepoint Swift made for him that features the chorus of Drake’s 2013 hit “Started from the Bottom.” READ FULL STORY

Avicii tops Spotify's inaugural Top 25 Artists Under 25 list

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Spotify listeners really, really like Avicii.

The EDM star leads Spotify’s first-ever Top 25 Artists Under 25 list, a ranking of the most influential young music-makers. The streaming service looked at No. 1 hits, volume and growth of streams and shares, and viral chart success from the last year to compile the results.

Avicii easily took the top spot — the 24-year-old Swedish DJ’s track “Wake Me Up” is the most-streamed song in Spotify history. He’s also the first artist under 25 to reach one billion streams on the site. READ FULL STORY

Miranda Lambert leads CMT Music Awards 2014 nominations

Thanks to her friends in country music, Miranda Lambert leads the Country Music Television nominations by pairing with her husband Blake Shelton, her girl group Pistol Annies, and good friend Keith Urban.

She’s up for two individual awards for her “Automatic” video, two for collaborating with the Annies on Shelton’s song “Boys ‘Round Here,” and two more for her duet with Urban on “We Were Us.” READ FULL STORY

Watch Taylor Swift's cat-party ACM 'For Your Consideration' video

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Taylor Swift may have painted the world red in last year’s “For Your Consideration” video for the Academy of Country Music Awards (ACMs) but this year, the singer and her Big Machine label boss Scott Borchetta opted for a sillier approach.

The tongue-in-cheek clip opens with Borchetta realizing that the only thing he has yet to check off on the “Taylor To-Do List” of world domination is create a for-your-consideration ACM video. Borchetta quickly calls Taylor but before he can get a word in, Swift puts him on hold to take care of more pressing matters like painting her nails and pampering her famous kitty-cat, Meredith.

Watch Taylor Swift’s ACM “For Your Consideration” video below:

READ FULL STORY

Least surprising news of the year: Taylor Swift is super rich

Taylor Swift is fantastically popular, a cultural juggernaut whose ubiquity has never seemed to quench the populace’s thirst for more. But as plenty of fame-soaked cautionary tales have taught us, that level of exposure doesn’t always equal financial solvency.

Of course, Swift doesn’t have that problem. At all. According to a list just published by Billboard, Swift was the top-earning musician in 2013, raking in $39,699,575.60 (specific!) based on album sales, touring revenue, publishing fees, and royalties from airplay, digital streaming and downloads.

That does not include any money Swift might have collected from sponsorship deals, corporate gigs, or whatever back end she still may be earning from Valentine’s Day. Also, because Billboard uses a standard methodology for all artists across the board (assuming, for example, a 20 percent artists’ take on album sales), it’s easy to believe that Swift’s intake was even higher, as she most likely has a better royalty rate than your average country-pop megastar. Another thing to note? She gives a lot of it awayREAD FULL STORY

Grammys 2014, on the scene: What you didn't see on TV, plus Taylor Watch!

Every year, the Grammys are loaded with as many artists and performances as possible within three and a half hours (or more, given that this year ran long and they still had to play the credits over the finale). Because of those mega-performances, it’s a televised event that’s just as enjoyable in person — or probably more so.

The inside of Staples Center feels like a one-night-only festival where all the most relevant pop stars and biggest artists of the past are on one bill. And they play together. And they try to one-up each other, meaning that even if a performance isn’t great, it goes down swinging (we might throw Katy Perry’s “Dark Horse” witch-fest into the latter category).

Here are some observations from EW’s crew on the inside, including our view of Taylor Swift, when she wasn’t caught on camera dancing in the crowd.

READ FULL STORY

Sara Bareilles on her Grammy nominations: 'I've always had the imposter syndrome'

When asked about winning awards, many artists spout clichés about it being an honor to just be nominated. Sara Bareilles, though — who is up for two major categories at this Sunday’s Grammy Awards — really sounds like she means it.

“It just felt like validation, like acceptance,” Bareilles told EW of her nomination for Album of the Year for her 2013 collection The Blessed Unrest. “To put me among the other nominees… My peers in that category are—I mean, Taylor Swift is a juggernaut.”

“I’ve always had the imposter syndrome, like I don’t really belong here,” she continued. “I keep waiting for someone to tap me on the shoulder and be like, ‘Uh, you have to go.’ I think I’m finally relaxing a little bit about that. Love me or hate me, I’ve earned my place here. That’s how it feels. I think I’d be doing this whether I was able to be a Grammy nominee or not. This is the reason I think I got a turn on the Earth.”

She has been nominated a few times before, though these nominations felt different because Bareilles thought she was done with The Blessed Unrest. READ FULL STORY

The Oscar music snubs: no love for Taylor Swift, Lana Del Rey, 'Llewyn Davis' or Coldplay

Check to make sure the rivers haven’t turned to blood and all first-borns aren’t suddenly afflicted with pox, because the impossible has happened: Taylor Swift was not nominated for an award.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ passing on Swift’s “Sweeter Than Fiction” (from the film One Chance) is easily one of the most high-profile snubs from this morning’s Oscar nominations announcement. The song was nominated for a Golden Globe and seemed like an obvious pick for an invite on Oscar night, if only because people love giving Taylor Swift gold trophies (and also because it would have brought some much-needed youth to the Oscar party).

Instead, the contenders in the Best Original Song category are U2’s “Ordinary Love” (from Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom), Karen O’s “The Moon Song” (Her), Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” (Despicable Me 2), Bruce Broughton and Dennis Spiegel’s “Alone But Not Alone” (from the deeply obscure Christian film of the same name), and the song “Let It Go” from the Disney blockbuster Frozen, which is performed by Idina Menzel and written by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez. (It’s the writers, not the performers, who take home the gold.)

The race seems to be down to the Golden Globe winner and sentimental favorite “Ordinary Love” (which would be as much an award for the late Nelson Mandela as it would be for U2) and the sales juggernaut “Let It Go” (which has propelled the Frozen soundtrack to the top of the mainstream album chart and elevated it to gold status). “Happy” and “The Moon Song” are much longer shots, but both are both cool choices crafted by deeply respected members of the music world.

Of course, that leaves “Alone But Not Alone,” one of the most inexplicable Oscar nominations in the history of the awards. The film barely exists, and the song itself is a dreary dirge of a hymn that sounds like it should be played in the midst of a sleepy Sunday morning mass. It has virtually no chance of winning, and its legacy will be as a bizarre curiosity in a category notorious for them.

It would be a less shocking inclusion if the Oscar nomination shortlist (75 songs in all) didn’t contain so many markedly stronger options. READ FULL STORY

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