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Tag: The Avett Brothers (1-10 of 15)

The Avett Brothers talk about their new album, explain who's the 'Magpie' and who's the 'Dandelion'

North Carolina folk-rockers The Avett Brothers recently released their eighth full-length album, Magpie and the Dandelion — which is also their third effort with super-producer Rick Rubin, who worked with them on their breakout hit “I And Love And You.” Led by single “Another Is Waiting,” whose video premiered here on EW.com, Magpie debuted at No. 5 on Billboard 200, giving the banjo-plucking troupe their second straight Top 5 debut.

A few weeks before the album’s release, EW caught up with the band before a PBS taping at the McCittrick Hotel. Bassist Bob Crawford couldn’t participate in the interview, but brothers Seth and Scott Avett sat down with us to talk about their new music, their bird obsession, how Crawford’s young daughter is doing (she was diagnosed with cancer in 2012), and what the title Magpie and the Dandelion means.

Why are you releasing an album just a year after The Carpenter?
Scott Avett: It used to be commonplace for us. We were hard on ourselves early on. We felt obligated to put something out every year. That felt very appropriate for some reason. So the material presented itself — we realized it was there.

You’d recorded it already?
Scott: Yeah, we’d recorded most of it with The Carpenter, not thinking it would come out as an album necessarily, but maybe it would come out as singles or extra material or what not. The more we listened to it, the more we realized there was a piece, a whole there that deserved to be together and synchronized. READ FULL STORY

'Scandal' star Bellamy Young's iPod: The Civil Wars, XTC, Bonnie Raitt and more

On the hit ABC drama Scandal, Bellamy Young plays cutthroat First Lady Mellie Grant, and though that show is full of classic R&B and funk tunes, Grant would probably prefer listening to the icy grooves of Kraftwerk or Berlin-era David Bowie.

But Young’s taste runs the gamut — from fellow North Carolinans the Avett Brothers (she’s originally from Asheville) to the New Wave worldbeat of Peter Gabriel. Here’s a smattering of what can be found on her iPod. READ FULL STORY

New Releases Roundup: Read EW's reviews of Paul McCartney, Pearl Jam, Gavin DeGraw, and more

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Every Tuesday morning in New Releases Roundup, we’ll publish our reviews of the week’s releases as found in the pages of Entertainment Weekly. This week: Paul McCartney, Pearl Jam, Gavin DeGraw, the Avett Brothers, and Scotty McCreery. 

Paul McCartney, New  “McCartney earns points just for seeking out new ideas, but New hangs on the strength of the songs. He’s got formidable storytelling chops (which especially inform the dreamy ‘On My Way to Work’), but he is also smart enough to get out of the way of a bombastic hook, as on the punchy ‘I Can Bet.”’ (Click here for Kyle Anderson’s full review.)

Pearl Jam, Lightning Bolt  “Eddie Vedder, now 48, hurls down a new, if unsurprising, preoccupation: mortality. Vedder wonders whether the bell tolls for him on the otherwise easygoing ‘Sirens,’ a piano-plunking ballad to rank with their classics, and human life itself seems to be ”tempting fate” on the album’s knotty, lovely centerpiece, ‘Infallible.”’ (Click here for Nick Catucci’s full review.)

READ FULL STORY

See The Avett Brothers' 'Another Is Waiting' music video -- EXCLUSIVE

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Americana mainstays The Avett Brothers are gearing up for the release of their eighth full-length album Magpie and the Dandelion, which will arrive in stores on Oct. 15 — just one year after their critically acclaimed disc The Carpenter reached No. 4 on the Billboard 200.

Today, the band is premiering the music video for “Another is Waiting,” the rollicking first single from their new collection, right here on EW. Scott Avett co-directed the clip, which follows a fresh-faced young lady’s journey through a high-pressure modeling world where the beauties are all, in fact, skeletal.

It’s a commentary, of course, on the dangers of the chew-you-up-spit-you-out entertainment business (Notice the sign at the entrance of the modeling agency: “Pricuf Aim” = “Price of fame”), and it finds the banjo-plucking boys warning the girl, “You got to get yourself off that conveyor belt.”

Does she heed their advice? Find out in the video below. (FYI, this clip may not work on some mobile devices.) READ FULL STORY

Jack White, Marcus Mumford among performers at 'Inside Llewyn Davis' concert

Joel and Ethan Coen could not have picked a better time to make Inside Llewyn Davis, their hard-to-spell tribute to the folk rock of the 1960s that has come back to dominate the rock landscape in the 21st century.

As a tie-in to the film and a fundraiser for the National Recording Preservation Foundation, Jack White, Marcus Mumford, Joan Baez, and the Avett Brothers will perform at a special concert at New York’s Town Hall on September 29. The concert was put together by legendary producer and Inside Llewyn Davis music supervisor T Bone Burnett.

“We decided to do a concert to bring together the community that had done the music,” Burnett told the New York Times.  “So there would be some synergy between the music and the film.”

Burnett also wanted to bridge the gap between old school and new school, which is why the lineup includes upstarts like Conor Oberst, Carolina Chocolate Drops’ Rhiannon Giddens, and Colin Meloy of the Decemberists, as well as Patti Smith and Gillian Welch. There will also be a performance by Oscar Isaac, who plays the title character in the film, which is loosely based around the story of folkie Dave Van Ronk. (The concert will not feature Inside Llewyn Davis actor Justin Timberlake, who’s scheduled to be in London that day.)

Inside Llewyn Davis will be released in theaters on December 6, while the soundtrack—co-executive produced by Burnett and Mumford and featuring a never-released Bob Dylan track—will hit store shelves on November 12.

CMT Awards: Best and worst of the broadcast

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The real winners were announced last night at the 2013 CMT Music Awards, a fan-voted program that technically honors country-music videos. Still, here are a few more honors from the unremarkable telecast you should feel free to weigh in on:

Worst hosts: With dead eyes and a stiff posture, Jason Aldean left returnee Kristen Bell to once again try way too hard to elicit laughter from the crowd. Their ongoing gag about which duet to sing together (a thinly veiled attempt to get people to use the #CMTawards hashtag) was downright painful — and frequent teleprompter issues didn’t help. These two were no Brad and Carrie. They were no Blake and Reba, either. Heck, they were no Blake and Luke — and that’s saying something. READ FULL STORY

Best and Worst 2012: The year in country music

Ah, what a year in music it’s been! Here at EW, we’ve been in retrospective overdrive, looking back at the best and worst albums, singles, lyrics, and soundtracks that 2012 had to offer.

But since I’m already primed to hop onto a plane and head home down South for the holidays, I thought it might be fun to take let my music tastes do the same and take a deep-dive into the country music world. Here’s my take on the year that was — country music style:

BEST: Little Big Town The hard-working quartet has always had the respect of Nashville for their on-point harmonies and sumptuous live performances, so it was nice to see them find true mainstream success in 2012. “Pontoon” was a fresh, tongue-in-cheek summer smash that motorboated all the way to No. 1.

BEST: Eric Church With a sand-papery voice, a trademark baseball cap (which have now officially replaced cowboy hats), a drink in his hand, and some genuinely great melodies, Eric Church joined country’s A-list this year. “Springsteen” was a wide-open crossover hit that gave his confidently country disc Chief the mainstream appeal it deserved. Of course, it didn’t hurt that Chief won the CMA Award for Album of the Year, either. READ FULL STORY

Grammy Nominations 2013: Your water cooler cheat sheet!

The Grammy nominations are in — and by now, we hope you’ve had time to do the following: Read the full list of major nominees, peruse Kyle Anderson’s take on the biggest snubs and surprises, and enjoy Scooter Braun’s Twitter tantrum.

But if all that’s not enough for you, we’ve cobbled together some interesting trends about this year’s crop of Grammy nominees — so even if you’re not a Grammys aficionado, you can pretend to be one around the office.

* The Best Album category this year is oddly rock-heavy With the notable exception of Frank Ocean’s Channel Orange, the Best Album category is dominated by rock acts. But whereas the category (until very recently) used to feature the likes of Bruce Springsteen, Paul McCartney, and Robert Plant and Allison Krauss, it’s now honoring a newer crop of rockers.

Or, as one of my co-workers put it, “It’s like the Grammy voters have replaced their old fogies with young fogies.” The inclusion of The Black Keys’ El Camino and Jack White’s Blunderbuss feels especially odd, since both of those acts’ previous albums were substantially better than those efforts. (Though the White Stripes’ excellent 2004 release Elephant did get a nod that year.) Add in Mumford & Sons’s Babel and fun.’s Some Nights, and you’ve got a very dude-ish, very guitar-heavy category. READ FULL STORY

How Mumford & Sons and Taylor Swift are causing a seismic shift in the music industry

The biggest debut of 2012 doesn’t belong to a glossy pop act like One Direction or Justin Bieber.

Sure, those boys have hordes of teenage girls ready to download their music at the drop of a tweet, but they’ve got nothing on the scruffy gents of Mumford & Sons, whose new disc, Babel sold 600,000 copies in its first seven days. (The next-best opening? Bieber’s Believe, with 374,000 in week 1.)

Babel‘s success (it has now led the chart for three weeks and sold 865,000 copies total) is indicative of a larger shift within the music industry. As pop music morphs into a glow-stick dance party, country acts have adopted the traditional pop sound. That leaves Mumford and the burgeoning Americana and folk genres (think acoustic guitars, banjos, and innumerable fitted tweed vests) to fill the country void. Did you get all that? Allow us to break it down. READ FULL STORY

The Avett Brothers on 'The Carpenter,' Gap ads, faith, and how cancer has shaped their songs

The Avett Brothers may be one of the hottest acts in the music industry right now — their album The Carpenter debuted at No. 4 on the Billboard 200 last week — but that doesn’t mean they have an entourage cleaning up after them.

Empty pizza boxes and orange peels were strewn throughout their room at New York City’s Dream Hotel — which apparently leaves oranges on your pillows — where I sat down with Scott and Seth Avett (left and right, respectively) as well as bassist Bob Crawford (center) to chat about their new album, the currently hot state of Americana music, and the driving force behind their songs.

On a recent rainy Tuesday afternoon, the day before the band performed on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, the three gents crowded onto the end of one of their hotel room’s unmade beds to talk about their long road to stardom, the changing face of the industry, and why Warrior is the best movie ever.

Below, read the full conversation, and at the end of the interview, check out an exclusive video of the Avett Brothers breaking down the lyrics of their album closer “Life.” READ FULL STORY

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