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Tag: The Beatles (1-10 of 72)

Flaming Lips frontman Wayne Coyne on the band's new Beatles cover album, late nights with Miley, and why he doesn't love weed

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In the three decades since Oklahoma psych-rock icons the Flaming Lips formed, they’ve made no secret of their love for twee, trippy antics. They’re particularly infamous for their over-the-top live shows, in which they perform in Martian or animal costumes and shower the audience with confetti while singer Wayne Coyne rolls over the crowd in a giant plastic bubble.

The Lips are fond of experimentation offstage as well, recording not just 13 studio albums but a slew of limited-edition releases and collaborations, including 2010’s song-for-song cover of Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon and a 2011 EP that was stored on a flash drive inside a gummy human skull. They’ve also dabbled in film, with projects like the bonkers 2008 holiday film Christmas on Mars and an inscrutable, NSFW five-minute short film, released earlier this year, called “Blonde SuperFreak Steals the Magic Brain.” In it, Miley Cyrus smokes a joint, a nude woman is sprayed with glitter, and Coyne sings from within a massive cardboard rainbow.

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Hear Miley Cyrus and the Flaming Lips' trippy 'Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds' cover

When the Flaming Lips finalized their star-studded Sgt. Pepper tribute album, With a Little Help From My Fwends, last month, more than a few feared Miley Cyrus would take a wrecking ball to her contribution, “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds.” Now the Lips have released the track, which also features Moby, along with pre-ordering details. READ FULL STORY

You can now watch the 'lost' Beatles cartoon series on YouTube

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The 1968 feature Yellow Submarine was a landmark in the popular perception of animation as a legitimate art form, but even as the Beatles were lending their likenesses to that groundbreaking work, they were also appearing in a considerably less advanced example of the form.

A cheaply made cartoon series called The Beatles ran on ABC from 1965 to 1969, and while its shabby production quality has resulted in it being largely forgotten outside of hardcore Beatles fandom, as Flavorwire notes, a YouTube account called Beatles Planet has made all 39 episodes available for curious viewers.

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Paul McCartney made a song for new game 'Destiny,' and it is terrible

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Though it’s a studio that makes games about shooting aliens, Bungie has always managed to score its creations with grand, operatic themes that are often quite pretty. You can thank the studio’s former composer Marty O’Donnell for that—O’Donnell’s sounds filled every major Bungie release, and although he was fired in April, he’s still responsible for a large portion of the music you’ll hear in Destiny, the studio’s latest, biggest game. To the surprise of many, some of that music involves Paul McCartney. Yes, that Paul McCartney. READ FULL STORY

The Cure covers the Beatles' 'Hello Goodbye' with Paul McCartney's son

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The Cure hasn’t recorded together in six years, but now they’re singing “hello” to fans (and also “goodbye”).

The English rockers reunited to record a cover of The Beatles’ “Hello Goodbye” featuring a special guest: Paul McCartney’s son, James, on keyboard. Their version doesn’t stray far from the original, and James’ physical resemblance to his dad turns the otherwise ordinary recording session into a clip that’s eerily similar to watching Papa McCartney perform. READ FULL STORY

Paul McCartney on when he'll retire: 'When I feel like it, but that's not today'

Paul McCartney probably isn’t the first person you picture when you think Ibiza, the Spanish island known for its hard-partying ways. But when he had the chance to go on vacation thanks to doctor’s orders to rest, he and his wife headed straight there. “We didn’t exactly go clubbing, but there’s plenty of it about,” he told Rolling Stone in a new interview.

The Ibiza vacation didn’t last too long—McCartney’s currently on tour and isn’t planning on stopping anytime soon. “The answer to ‘Are you going to retire?’ is ‘When I feel like it,'” McCartney said. “But that’s not today.”

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On the scene at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony: Nirvana, Kiss, chaos, and... Lorde?

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At one point during his speech at the 2014 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, E Street Band guitarist Steve Van Zandt referenced the fact that being inducted meant he was joining his heroes who had already been made immortal.

But for all its power, rock music is still made by human beings, and this year’s crop of inductees—E Street, Nirvana, Kiss, Hall and Oates, Cat Stevens, Peter Gabriel, Linda Ronstadt, Brian Epstein, and Andrew Loog-Oldham—and the presentations honoring their contributions to the pop world were defined by the various absences spread across the five hour show (which will be edited and presented on HBO on May 31).  READ FULL STORY

On the Charts: Eric Church rules, Beatles get a bump, Imagine Dragons break a record

Though the year is still young, Eric Church has established himself as the 2014 music sales king. His just-released fifth album The Outsiders debuted with a walloping 288,000 copies in its opening week. That’s Church’s second number one debut and his biggest sales week ever (his previous high was his fourth album Chief, which moved 145,000 units on its way to a chart-topping bow back in 2011).

Church didn’t have much competition at the marketplace, as there were not any other top 10 debuts this week—the next highest debut was the new album by Glitch Mob, which came in at number 13 with 22,000 copies sold. But elsewhere on the Billboard 200, there was one clear trend: the rise of the Beatles. READ FULL STORY

The Beatles Grammy Salute performances: The good, the bad, and the tacky from John Mayer, Brad Paisley, Pharrell, Adam Levine and more

“I was wondering if it was seemly to tribute yourself,” said Sir Paul McCartney in the most quotable moment from last night’s prerecorded CBS special, “The Beatles: The Night That Changed America—A Grammy Salute.” Naturally, it was “a couple of American guys” who convinced him that awards-show-style indulgence was called for on the 50th anniversary of The Ed Sullivan Show bringing Beatlemania to these United States. But when Paul—and, let’s not forget, Ringo Starr—finally performed, they did it with such earnestness, good humor, and energy that all the self-congratulation seemed crowded out. The bummer was that the Yanks who covered Beatles songs in the two hours leading up to this casually historic finale missed a big fat opportunity to inject more tacky, over-the-top American spirit into the proceedings. The lusty screams of young women in cat-eye glasses seemed distant indeed.

Although we must recognize Adam Levine and John Mayer for bringing a louche, careless, cruise-ship vibe to “Ticket to Ride” and “Don’t Let Me Down,” respectively. Especially Mayer, who, with his appealing voice and hobo-stylist look, took his bittersweet selection to an irreverent climax, trading guitar faces with Keith Urban, his sleekly metrosexual partner. Honorable mentions go to Katy Perry, who gave “Yesterday” a literal representation in the form of her retro dress, with its yards and yards of flowery fabric (fashion scolds attacked this choice when they first spotted it on the red carpet); and the louchest of them all, Joe Walsh, who popped up in a couple places, wailing on his guitar and reminding everyone that rock excess endures even when it disdains mind expansion—and that this can be groovy, too. READ FULL STORY

'The Beatles: The Night That Changed America': Why 'Ed Sullivan Show' was more than a musical moment -- VIDEO

When The Beatles performed on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964, I wasn’t alive, but I knew exactly who to ask about the Brits’ American television debut: my mom. She described sitting at home at age 11 with her family, and as each song played — “All My Loving,” “She Loves You,” “I Saw Her Standing There,” “I Want to Hold Your Hand” — she inched closer to the edge of the couch. Then she slid down the couch to be closer to the TV. Then she was cross-legged on the floor. Then she had her face right up by the screen. She needed to be as close as possible to the Fab Four and their music — and she wasn’t alone.

More than 73 million Americans gathered around their televisions on the night of Feb. 9, 1964, and on Sunday at 8 p.m. ET, exactly 50 years later to the day and time, The Beatles: The Night That Changed America — A Grammy Salute will bring us back to that magical night. The two-and-a-half-hour show includes the band’s famous fans performing their biggest hits; interviews with those involved in the Sullivan telecast, including David Letterman’s sit-down with Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr (check out a preview below); and a Beatles reunion performance.

But it was so much more than just a musical moment. As the show’s producer, Ken Ehrlich, told EW, the country was searching for something to rally around after months of tragedy.
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