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Tag: The Beatles (11-20 of 73)

'The Beatles: The Night That Changed America': Why 'Ed Sullivan Show' was more than a musical moment -- VIDEO

When The Beatles performed on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964, I wasn’t alive, but I knew exactly who to ask about the Brits’ American television debut: my mom. She described sitting at home at age 11 with her family, and as each song played — “All My Loving,” “She Loves You,” “I Saw Her Standing There,” “I Want to Hold Your Hand” — she inched closer to the edge of the couch. Then she slid down the couch to be closer to the TV. Then she was cross-legged on the floor. Then she had her face right up by the screen. She needed to be as close as possible to the Fab Four and their music — and she wasn’t alone.

More than 73 million Americans gathered around their televisions on the night of Feb. 9, 1964, and on Sunday at 8 p.m. ET, exactly 50 years later to the day and time, The Beatles: The Night That Changed America — A Grammy Salute will bring us back to that magical night. The two-and-a-half-hour show includes the band’s famous fans performing their biggest hits; interviews with those involved in the Sullivan telecast, including David Letterman’s sit-down with Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr (check out a preview below); and a Beatles reunion performance.

But it was so much more than just a musical moment. As the show’s producer, Ken Ehrlich, told EW, the country was searching for something to rally around after months of tragedy.
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Stevie Wonder to perform with Daft Punk at the Grammys

Electronic music duo Daft Punk already got lucky when their album Random Access Memories was nominated for five Grammys this year, including Album of the Year and Best Pop/Group performance for “Get Lucky.” Now, the masked pair will get to perform with Stevie Wonder at the Grammys on Jan. 26.

Pharrell and Nile Rodgers, who both appear on Daft Punk’s latest album, will also join in the performance, along with Random Access Memories session players Chris Caswell, Nathan East, Omar Hakim, and Paul Jackson Jr. Not only will the performance be the first televised gig since the album’s release in May, but it will be the first televised performance for the French group since they performed with Kanye West at the 2008 Grammys.

In addition to the Wonder/Punk collaboration, the Grammys also announced a special tribute to The Beatles, reuniting the British synthpop duo Eurythmics. The special, The Night That Changed America: A Grammy Salute to the Beatles, will air Feb. 9 on CBS, the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ debut performance on The Ed Sullivan Show, and will be taped the night after the actual Grammys. The special is also set to feature Keith Urban, John Legend, Maroon 5, John Mayer, and Alicia Keys. The performance will mark the reunion of Eurythmics, who haven’t performed since the 2005 American Music Awards. On picking the band, Grammys exec producer Ken Ehrlich says, “When it came around to booking this show, what I felt was important was to try and find those artists who not only would be able to interpret Beatles songs, but would also have an… understanding of what they meant.”

The 56th Annual Grammy Awards will air on CBS Sunday, Jan. 26, at 8 p.m. ET.

Paul McCartney on reconciling with Yoko Ono: 'She's badass'

His album may be called New, but Paul McCartney is still down to discuss something as old as the ’60s: his rocky relationship with Yoko Ono.

In a new interview with Rolling Stone, Sir Paul cleared the air regarding his longrunning public disputes with John Lennon’s widow over the years, telling the magazine that things have been going smoothly thanks to “time, the great healer.”

“She’s badass,” McCartney admitted. “I thought, ‘If John loved her, there’s got to be something. He’s not stupid.’ It’s like, what are you going to do? Are you going to hold a grudge you never really had?”

He added that the late George Harrison also provided some helpful advice: “George would say to me, ‘You don’t want stuff like that hanging around in your life.'” READ FULL STORY

On the Scene at Paul McCartney's 'Jimmy Kimmel Live!' concert: Something old, something 'New'

When Paul McCartney and his Beatles bandmates performed an unannounced concert on a London rooftop in 1969 for their Let It Be film, the police eventually came in and shut it down. But McCartney and Jimmy Kimmel had the cops’ blessing Monday night in Los Angeles, as they took to the roof of the El Capitan Theatre, promising a free show from the one-and-only Sir Paul for the gathered masses.

Monday’s Jimmy Kimmel Live! TV audience only caught two of those songs. After that, as McCartney told us when he hit the stage, “The rest is just for you.” Here’s what you missed if you weren’t one of the 10,000 people lining Hollywood Boulevard:
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Dhani Harrison, Alexa Ray Joel cover dads' songs for Gap ads

Billy Joel’s Grammy-winning song “Just The Way You Are” was famously written for his first wife Elizabeth Weber—a woman he divorced five years later. Joel semi-retired the tune because of that, but it’s about to get a resurrection to sell some jeans.

Tonight will mark the premiere of a new series of TV spots from the Gap that feature the children of legendary musicians—Alexa Ray Joel and Dhani Harrison, son of Beatle George—re-interpreting their dads’ classic tracks. Joel (whose mother is Christie Brinkley) will be tackling “Just the Way You Are,” while Harrison will be performing “For You Blue,” a track from the Beatles’ Let It Be written by George Harrison.

For a brand like ours, built on the ‘generation gap,’ it seemed really rich,” Seth Farbman, Gap’s Chief Marketing Officer, told Ad Age. “We’ve been spending a lot of time really looking at what an iconic brand does and how it acts. … And, as we often do, we were looking backwards, in order to go forwards.”

The spots are scheduled to air during a season premieres (which begin in earnest tonight and will continue over the next few weeks—check out EW’s Fall TV Preview, on stands now, for more) as well as during NFL games.

Or you can just watch them both below, along with some behind-the-scenes video of the shoots.  READ FULL STORY

Paul McCartney releases single 'New,' announces album for October

Paul McCartney helped construct the greatest album of all time, among other minor accomplishments, so it’s not like the guy has anything left to prove at this point.

And yet at 71 years old, he’s still going hard. Last year, he released a new solo album called Kisses on the Bottom, which was made up mostly of traditional pop covers and re-worked jazz tunes. Now he’s got a batch of freshly-written original material, and he’s ready to unleash it.

According to a press release sent out late last night, McCartney’s new album New will be arriving in stores on October 15. It features 12 new songs and a heaping helping of fresh collaborators, including Mark Ronson, who worked on the title track that also dropped last night.

The album is currently available for pre-order on iTunes, and the single is for sale. Give “New” a listen below.

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How we chose our 100 All-Time Greatest Albums

Hey, “LOL” and “NerdyGirl55″—we heard you. Nonetheless, here comes an explanation of how (and why) we picked our 100 Greatest Albums of All-Time list. Hopefully, Nerdy—do you mind if I call you Nerdy? Your EW.com comment condemning our list suggests some level of comfort and familiarity—you don’t throw your laptop against the wall, like you say you did your All-Time Greatest issue of the magazine, after reading this.

Like you, we love movies and TV and books and music—it’s our passion (and also, of course, our day job). And you know what? Love doesn’t always come easy. For instance, Love’s “psychedelic beauty” Forever Changes landed at No. 65 on our final list, but not without a lot of arguing and back and forth amongst the writers and editors. And that’s how, over time, a list like this takes form and gets made.

Everyone has their personal biases. My own top 100 list would have a few more Bowie records; The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars found itself at No. 34, but I’d happily add Hunky DoryStation to Station, and Scary Monsters. I’d also want to add at least one more from from the Who—Tommy, can you hear me?—in addition to Who’s Next (No. 39). To make room, I’d probably cut an album or two from the Beatles, maybe one from Dylan. (He has two on the list: Blood on the Tracks at No. 6, and Highway 61 Revisited at No. 27.) And, for that, I know more than a few of you would probably want to cut me.

But in order for a list like this to come to life, clearly those personal biases need to be put aside. Professionally, I can’t argue against the Beatles being the most important and significant act of the album era, which we thought would make the best parameters for a definitive Entertainment Weekly music list. (Imagine a greatest songs of all time list in which you had to size up a traditional folk staple like “Greensleeves” against “Eleanor Rigby.”) That’s why our oldest entry (1965’s Rubber Soul, the album the lovely ladies above are packing at the EMI factory in 1965, which ranks No. 46) and our top entry (Revolver, perched at No. 1) belong to the Fab Four: They ushered in and defined the album era, not to mention pop music generally for the past 50 years. (In a recent interview, über-producer Rick Rubin put it thusly: “It’s much bigger than four kids from Liverpool. For me the Beatles are proof of the existence of God. It’s so good and so far beyond everyone else that it’s not them.”)

Not surprisingly, we received a lot of mail about Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band not making our final list; demerits were given for, among other things, “Lovely Rita.” (Not to mention every terrible album featuring a sitar that came after.) But four of our 100 albums are by the Beatles, so the point of their importance is made; they dominate our list. However, we also needed to consider that there have been thousands of albums, and many very, very good to great ones of differing genres. (As much as we love classical and jazz, it made the most sense for us to reflect what we tend to cover in the magazine and what fills our readers’ iPods: pop, rock, and hip-hop.)

Plus, let’s face it:  It’s 2013, and for us to all assume nothing good happened in music after 1970 is just plain silly. So artists like Kayne West (No. 8 for My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy) and Adele (No. 17 for 21) need to be weighed against the no-brainer entrants such as the Beatles and Rolling Stones. Which also means you need to consider legacy and what’s going on in the culture right now that refocuses the lens: Daft Punk’s Discovery jumped a few spots (to No. 24) from when we started this list several months ago, because there’s a strong argument (of which I am sure some of you will take me up on below) that they’re largely responsible for the global rise of EDM, and even though their recent Random Access Memories has received rave reviews, it’s Discovery that made their current success at all possible. As indispensable as Pearl Jam’s Ten seemed 20 years ago, it’s hard to not take into account every awful Creed album it paved the way for.

We also wish it were possible to cram 500 albums into a top 100 list. It’s not, of course, but hopefully the takeaway from our 100 Greatest Albums list is an accurate snapshot of the landscape, defining artists, and game-changing music moments over the past 50 years. We will certainly argue it is.

Serious question: What was the last truly great rock album?

By now, you’ve probably combed through Entertainment Weekly‘s All Time Greatest issue, which features our humble picks for the 100 best albums ever made. (Within certain paremeters—the lack of jazz or, you know, Beethoven should have tipped you off to the list’s limitations.)

Though I’m proud of the amount of hip-hop, R&B, and pop featured on the final tally of 100, the list is dominated by rock albums. That’s to be expected, as rock music (and particularly the albums made by the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan) set the template for what an album was and what it could be, and there have been few variations on that template since the ’60s. (For all its forward-thinking and genre-hopping, Kanye West’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy is structured and paced an awful lot like a Beatles LP.)

Plus, traditional rock music had a few decades’ worth of a jump on other genres we incorporated into our list, so Rubber Soul and Blonde On Blonde have had an extra 20 years to constantly re-entrench themselves, while the legacies of the first wave of great hip-hop albums are only now just being established.

But another pattern emerged as we were putting the list together: As we considered newer albums to incorporate into the conversation, fewer and fewer of them were rock albums. READ FULL STORY

Courtney Love 'not amused' by Paul McCartney hooking up with Nirvana

As we noted in our on-the-scene report, there was a lot to be unamused by at the 12-12-12 concert in Madison Square Garden last night. Courtney Love thought so too — even before the show began.

According to a TMZ report, Love was “not amused” by the thought of Paul McCartney sitting in with her late husband’s band, Nirvana. And while her concerns regarding “Beatlevana” — Macca playing with Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic, and Pat Smear — were shared by many, her solution was a little less solid.

TMZ noted that Love was “upset at Krist and Dave for calling tonight’s show a Nirvana reunion because she says Kurt was the heart and soul of the legendary band,” which we totally get. But she also told them, “Look, if John were alive it would be cool,” referring of course to the late Lennon. Which, like, yeah — if we’re playing that game, it would also be cool if Kurt Cobain were alive.

At any rate, she and other Nirvana fans should be relieved to know that Paul’s little experiment with Grohl last night involved neither the music of Nirvana or of the Beatles, but rather an inoffensive, Led Zeppelin-y number titled, appropriately enough, “Cut Me Some Slack.” (We’ve reached out to Love for her thoughts, but her team declined to comment.)

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On the scene: SiriusXM Town Hall with Soundgarden

Image Credit: Cindy Ord/Getty Images for SiriusXM

Soundgarden just released King Animal, their first album in 16 years. So what better way to celebrate than with a Q&A session that moderator and Foo Fighters drummer Taylor Hawkins called “the raddest garage party ever”??

Last night, at an event hosted by SiriusXM at the legendary Electric Lady Studios in Greenwich Village, the reunited Seattle rockers took part in an informal Q&A session, moderated by Foo Fighters drummer Taylor Hawkins. The venue is microscopic; there were maybe fifty people there, so needless to say, there wasn’t an un-close seat in the house.

Now, most musicians don’t go into the business for the press circuit. They’re usually roped into these events by their publicists in order to promote an album or a tour, and they tend to answer questions — nearly all of which they have been asked countless times — with marginal, rehearsed enthusiasm. You could tell there was an element of forced publicity in last night’s session, but the discussion was surprisingly lively and informative.  READ FULL STORY

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