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Tag: Things That Are British (81-90 of 234)

Daniel Radcliffe emotes all over Slow Club's 'Beginners' video: Watch it here!

You know how Jon Hamm will basically show up to do anything that sounds fun, which is why he picked up more on-air time than Jay Pharoah on Saturday Night Live last season? Apparently, the British equivalent of “What if we got the guy from Mad Men to do a funny accent?” is “Let’s put one of those Harry Potter kids in a music video.”

Rupert Grint had a star turn in Ed Sheeran’s video for “Lego House” not too long ago, and perhaps not wanting to be one-upped by  (SPOILER ALERT FOR INFORMATION THAT HAS BEEN AVAILABLE FOR LITERALLY YEARS) his on-screen brother-in-law, Daniel Radcliffe stars in the one-shot video for Slow Club’s “Beginners.” In a single take, Radcliffe emotes all over a deserted pub and goes through a handful of breakdowns that manifest themselves in punching, leaping, playing air guitar, falling over, and ill-executed lip-syncing. Check out the clip below. READ FULL STORY

Radiohead stage collapse: Keane pay tribute to late drum technician

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The members of Keane have paid tribute to their late drum tech and stage manager Scott Johnson, who died on Saturday while working on a Radiohead show in Toronto.

The U.K. native sadly lost his life when a stage collapsed at Downsview Field in Toronto prior to Radiohead’s scheduled appearance. In a post on Keane’s website the band remembered their “great friend” as “a cheerful, dependable guy you could always turn to, who lifted the spirits of everyone around him. We can’t believe he’s gone. Our thoughts are with his family and friends; Radiohead and their crew. We love you Scotty, we’ll miss you.”

Yesterday, Radiohead drummer Phil Selway posted a message on the band’s website in which he described Johnson as “a lovely man, always positive, supportive and funny; a highly skilled and valued member of our great road crew.”

Read more:
Update: Radiohead drum technician identified as stage collapse victim
Radiohead stage collapse kills one, injures three before Toronto show

Paul McCartney is 70 today: What's your favorite Fab Macca song?

Paul McCartney celebrates his 70th birthday today. So how exactly should one celebrate the septuagenarian-ization of a man responsible for helping create pop music as we know it, and bringing us the best animated cartoon about singing frogs ever created?

Somehow, a Hallmark card and a Best Buy voucher didn’t seem to quite cut the mustard (particularly as Sir Paul could probably buy Best Buy with the loose change in his pocket). Instead, we thought we would ask you to name your favorite-ever McCartney track, be it a Beatles tune, a number from Wings, or something from his now more than four decade-long solo career.

To get things started, you’ll find a selection of great Paul pop below: READ FULL STORY

Morrissey on Obama: Brit-rock icon calls the President 'useless' and 'simply a set of teeth'

We’re not taking the high road on this one: Bigmouth strikes again.

The endlessly opinionated Morrissey let loose once again in a recent interview, and his targets included his homeland’s Queen and this country’s president.

The former Smiths frontmouth told MSN’s JuiceOnline that he considers President Obama to be “simply a set of teeth, and useless in every other regard,” a conclusion he reached while parsing both current events in Syria and modern forms of government in general.

“I think the age of the President or the Prime Minister is dead,” he said. “People everywhere have lost faith in politics, and rightly so. Something different needs to happen.”

“I think we were all initially swept along with the Obama win,” he continued. “But he’s proven to be simply a set of teeth, and useless in every other regard. Time and time again we see the same scenario whereby political figures only see the public as electorate, and once anyone is elected they appear to hate the people. British politics, as the world knows, is a joke. Yet it’s rarely funny.”

Speaking of Britain, you better believe Moz had something to say about the Queen’s nationwide block party:

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Florence + the Machine gets David LaChapelle for new 'Spectrum' video: Watch it here

Somebody has finally convinced David LaChapelle to direct another music video, and it isn’t Rihanna.

After a five-year break from the music-video game, the coveted photographer and director (along with his trusted choreographer John Byrne) has delivered arresting visuals for Florence + the Machine’s “Spectrum,” the newest single off the band’s Ceremonials.

The clip offers your eyeballs such theatrical imagery — leaping ballerinas, topless pharaohs,  art-deco sets — that Florence Welch’s scene-stealing red hair is one of the video’s tamer elements. Check out the “Spectrum” video for yourself:

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TV Jukebox: 'Don't Trust the B-- in Apartment 23,' 'Magic City,' 'Girls,' and more music-on-TV moments

Behind every great lady there’s a great man singing behind her — at least that was the case for most of this week’s Jukebox. In one instance, there was even a man singing as a lady (welcome back, Glee!). This week saw one particularly untrustworthy B—- in Apartment 23, a new slew of Girls, a masseuse with a heart of gold (The Client List), and a Scandal-ous Beltway fixer with brass… well, you get where I’m going. To paraphrase the great Aretha Franklin, sisters were doing it for themselves — with the help of artists as diverse as The Clash, Sleigh Bells, Paddy Casey, and Otis Redding, of course. Check out our picks below, and make sure to click through to the last page to listen to all the songs in our customized Spotify playlist. (Warning for those still catching up on DVR: SPOILERS ahead!) READ FULL STORY

Pulp make triumphant return to the U.S. with two sexy, bouncy shows at Radio City Music Hall

The last time bookish Britpop legends Pulp played a concert in the United States, I was just wrapping up my sophomore year in high school. The idea of making the trip into New York City to see a band was well out of the realm of possibility (at the time, I had to argue with my parents about seeing shows one town over), but for a hot minute I tried to devise some way I could see them. After all, their just-released sixth album This Is Hardcore was my absolute favorite album at the time (even though all the middle-aged suburban ennui went completely over my head), and the band was not doing the sort of full-scale tour that would have taken them to the local amphitheater in Hartford. So I had to put that idea to bed. “I’ll catch them next time,” I told myself.

How was I to know that it would take them nearly 14 years to come back? They put out one more tepidly-received album and promptly broke up. Frontman Jarvis Cocker moved to Paris, started a solo career, and seemed content to let his old band live in the past forever. The solo stuff was pretty strong, and I got to experience Cocker live in person twice in the interim, but there was still a distinct lack of “Disco 2000″ in my live concert history.

The band rewarded my patience with two phenomenally sharp shows at New York’s Radio City Music Hall this week, and during Tuesday night’s sinewy rendition of “This Is Hardcore,” I realized exactly why I love Cocker’s style as a frontman. He’s a deeply physical performer who has carved out a unique dance style. His voice isn’t the most technically proficient, but his songs would sound ridiculous if sung by anybody else. The choruses are as much about his vocal tics and asides as they are about the hooks themselves. His bands songs are deeply rooted in their conception period and yet strangely timeless. And he is so deeply ensconced in his character that it’s sometimes hard to tell where the irony begins.

With that resumé, it’s clear why I find Cocker so compelling: He’s almost exactly like David Lee Roth. READ FULL STORY

Damon Albarn says Blur and Gorillaz both likely done, still has 27 bands to tend to

With ’90s Britpop stalwarts Pulp about to play their first show in the United States in something like 15 years, the next great hope among stateside Anglophiles was Blur. Easily the most esoteric of U.K. chart-toppers, Blur cranked out seven albums’ worth of constantly evolving music that morphed from measured pop to sprawling genre-hopping art rock (especially on those last few albums).

The band called it quits after the release of 2003′s Think Tank, only to reunite a few years later for a handful of one-off shows and festival appearances (with Albarn still devoting equal time to Gorillaz-related projects and that wacky band with a guy from the Clash), and they even found time to record a pair of new songs (2010′s “Fool’s Day,” and the approaching release “Under the Westway”). With a big show coming up as part of the closing ceremonies at this summer’s Olympics, surely this meant the next step for a new Blur album, right?

Sadly, wrong. READ FULL STORY

On the Scene at 'MTV Unplugged Florence + the Machine': A Review

Florence-and-the-MachineImage Credit: Paul Redmond/WireImage.comDuring her MTV Unplugged session that aired Easter Sunday Florence Welch proved why she named her first album Lungs.

Though her voice fiercely registers on her records, freed from all those wall-of-sound arrangements it is truly something to behold. It’s not a perfect instrument, mind you. But every crack comes across like a world-weary badge of honor. When those final oh-whoa-ohs explode out of her throat during the a cappella closing of “Drumming Song,” it rattles you with Biblical force, like she isn’t just trying to put on a show. She’s trying to raise the dead. Kind of the perfect programming for Easter, huh?

Actually, Florence + the Machine’s entry into MTV’s venerable Unplugged franchise was perfect Sunday night fare for another reason too. With her delicate bone-colored dress and flaming red hair parted Druid-like down the middle, Welch could have been a stand-in for Carice van Houten as Melisandre on Game of Thrones. (Kanye West, sitting in the front row, could have been Salladhor Saan.)

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TV Jukebox: 'Mad Men,' 'Supernatural,' 'Missing,' and more music-on-TV moments

Old-school tracks were the name of the game more often than not these past few weeks. Whether your definition of “old-school” translates to proper Mad Men-era tunes heard on the AMC hit, Scandal, and Supernatural, or ’80s classics as seen on Happy Endings and One Tree Hill, this week’s Jukebox offers up a retro rave fit for anybody. Of course there were plenty of contemporary jams, too: MCs from London and the Bronx on Breakout KingsCSI: NY, and 90210, TV darlings Sleigh Bells on The Vampire Diaries, and Portland indie rockers Novosti on Missing, plus “show tunes” from GCB and Gossip Girl. Check out our picks below. (Warning for those still catching up on DVR: SPOILERS ahead!)

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