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Tag: U2 (1-10 of 36)

Bono says glaucoma is the real reason he's always wearing shades

Bono is rarely, if ever, seen without his trademark sunglasses, but the U2 frontman hasn’t worn them to make a fashion statement or define his look—he has been treating his glaucoma.

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U2's new music video is basically the expanded version of that Apple ad

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You know that incessant Apple commercial starring U2 that you haven’t been able to get off your TV? The song’s called “The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone),” and U2 just released a music video for it. That’s right: The video clip that you’ve probably seen more times than any music video since MTV still played the things wasn’t the actual music video.

The “Miracle (of Joey Ramone)” video is just the latest U2 stunt in which the band blurs the line between promotion and performance, like that notorious U2 iPod that came loaded with their discography 10 years ago. That’s because the video is essentially the same Apple ad, but branded as a new music video. The color palette is different, but this expanded version shows Bono and co. dancing against the same plain background, with images of Joey Ramone superimposed on them. Sort of like how you can’t listen to Songs of Innocence without at some point recalling how it emerged from a corporate deal with Apple, you can’t watch this video without recalling that a nearly identical version of it was an actual commercial for the company.

Watch the video below.

Bono on U2's 'Songs of Innocence' auto-download: 'I'm sorry about that'

When U2’s latest album, Songs of Innocence, automatically showed up on thousands of peoples’ iTunes accounts, many were mad. Mad enough that Apple eventually had to make an entire website to help users easily remove the album from their Apple devices.

A month later, U2 is still getting backlash for the move and got a chance to respond in a Facebook interview where someone asked, “Can you please never release an album on iTunes that automatically downloads to peoples’ playlists ever again? It’s really rude.” READ FULL STORY

Apple launches website to help users delete U2 album from their iTunes

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If you have an iTunes account, you also have U2’s latest album, Songs of Innocence, in your music library—whether you like it or not.

Apple held an event last week where the company announced their new iPhone models and the upcoming iWatch, and where U2 showed up to debut their new surprise album. Turns out, Apple fans didn’t just get some cool news about gadgets that day: Anyone with an Apple ID got U2’s album automatically added to their device. And some people are not happy about that.

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Love it or loathe it? Two EW critics debate U2's new album 'Songs of Innocence'

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Yesterday, U2—easily the biggest rock band left on the planet—surprised everyone when they released their long-in-gestation new album for free.

Songs of Innocence was made available to everybody with an iTunes account, which allows most everybody who listens to digital music to hear it; a physical version will be out on October 14, at which point it will be eligible to chart.

After a solid 12 hours of digesting the record — their first since 2010’s generally disappointing No Line on the Horizon — EW music experts Kyle Anderson and Miles Raymer fired up their e-mail machines, and their critical judgment.  READ FULL STORY

U2 release new album 'Songs of Innocence' for free on iTunes

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U2 will release their 13th album as a free download for iTunes subscribers, the band announced at today’s massive Apple event, where the Cupertino tech giant revealed its new iPhone models and Apple Watch. Actually, they already released it.

Apple CEO Tim Cook closed out the company’s annual mobile product unveiling by introducing a live performance by the Irish rockers and revealing that Songs of Innocence is now available on the iTunes Store as a free download to anyone with an account on the service. With an estimated 500 million users already signed up, it could quite easily become U2’s biggest record to date.

 

Eat the Beat: The tastiest songs about food

With the release of her new album Food last week, singer and Le Cordon Bleu-certified chef Kelis has gone from “Milkshake” to full-on smorgasbord — tracks on the album include “Jerk Ribs,” “Cobbler” “Friday Fish Fry,” and “Biscuits n’ Gravy.”

But she’s hardly the first artist to find her muse on a menu. Place your order below—and stream our full food playlist (minus a few songs that weren’t available on Spotify; apologies to fans of both Pumpkins and egg-based condiments): READ FULL STORY

U2's new 'Invisible' video brings on the light show, big round microphones: Watch it here

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If this was 1994 and U2 were still in their crazy art project phase, the video for “Invisible” would probably be a series of shots of an empty stage, or just a static four minutes of darkness. Because, you see, it’d be invisible.

Thankfully, the video for the band’s new single is not that literal. In stately black and white, the band cranks out their latest with the aid of some impressive backlight effects (good thing Bono wears those sunglasses!) and a wacky circular microphone that hangs from the ceiling. Like most 21st-century U2 projects, it’s well executed without being blow-away impressive, though “Invisible” continues to improve as a song with each subsequent listen.

Check out the video below: READ FULL STORY

New U2 song 'Invisible' premieres during Super Bowl -- VIDEO

U2 may be coy about when their new album is coming out, but fans got a taste of new music from the band with a new song, “Invisible,” which premiered during Sunday’s Super Bowl as part of the (RED) campaign to end AIDS. The song is currently a free download on iTunes through 11:59p.m. on Feb. 3. For each download, Bank of America is donating to the (RED) campaign.

Check out the teaser for the song in the video below:
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The Oscar music snubs: no love for Taylor Swift, Lana Del Rey, 'Llewyn Davis' or Coldplay

Check to make sure the rivers haven’t turned to blood and all first-borns aren’t suddenly afflicted with pox, because the impossible has happened: Taylor Swift was not nominated for an award.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ passing on Swift’s “Sweeter Than Fiction” (from the film One Chance) is easily one of the most high-profile snubs from this morning’s Oscar nominations announcement. The song was nominated for a Golden Globe and seemed like an obvious pick for an invite on Oscar night, if only because people love giving Taylor Swift gold trophies (and also because it would have brought some much-needed youth to the Oscar party).

Instead, the contenders in the Best Original Song category are U2’s “Ordinary Love” (from Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom), Karen O’s “The Moon Song” (Her), Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” (Despicable Me 2), Bruce Broughton and Dennis Spiegel’s “Alone But Not Alone” (from the deeply obscure Christian film of the same name), and the song “Let It Go” from the Disney blockbuster Frozen, which is performed by Idina Menzel and written by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez. (It’s the writers, not the performers, who take home the gold.)

The race seems to be down to the Golden Globe winner and sentimental favorite “Ordinary Love” (which would be as much an award for the late Nelson Mandela as it would be for U2) and the sales juggernaut “Let It Go” (which has propelled the Frozen soundtrack to the top of the mainstream album chart and elevated it to gold status). “Happy” and “The Moon Song” are much longer shots, but both are both cool choices crafted by deeply respected members of the music world.

Of course, that leaves “Alone But Not Alone,” one of the most inexplicable Oscar nominations in the history of the awards. The film barely exists, and the song itself is a dreary dirge of a hymn that sounds like it should be played in the midst of a sleepy Sunday morning mass. It has virtually no chance of winning, and its legacy will be as a bizarre curiosity in a category notorious for them.

It would be a less shocking inclusion if the Oscar nomination shortlist (75 songs in all) didn’t contain so many markedly stronger options. READ FULL STORY

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