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Author: Leah Greenblatt (1-10 of 709)

Ben Watt of Everything But the Girl's 'Spring': Watch the video here -- EXCLUSIVE

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Ben Watt may always be known best as The Boy in dreamy alt-pop duo Everything But the Girl, but the 51-year-old Londoner has been garnering some of the best notices of his career for the new album Hendra, his first solo release in more than three decades.

Hendra‘s collection of contemplative, gently strummy songs is currently streaming in full on NPR’s site  — and now you can find the official video for single “Spring” here. READ FULL STORY

The Black Keys release new song, 'Turn Blue' -- hear it here

What’s black and blue and new all over?

The Black Keys’ “Turn Blue” — the title track to their upcoming eighth album, debuted today on drummer Patrick Carney’s SiriusXM show “Serious Boredom.” Hear it here: READ FULL STORY

The ACM Awards: The night's best lines

“There’s20 million dollars worth of hairdos out here and it all has confetti in it. This is not a Head & Shoulders commercial, everybody.” —Luke Bryan, after show openers the Band Perry unleashed their confetti guns on the A-list front row.

“If you don’t like live music, then you need to go down the block and see Britney Spears.” — Blake Shelton in the opening monologue READ FULL STORY

ACM Awards: The winners list

Here’s who took home the televised prizes at tonight’s Academy of Country Music Awards:

Vocal Duo of the Year: Florida Georgia Line

New Artist of the Year: Justin Moore

Single Record of the Year: Miranda Lambert, “Mama’s Broken Heart”

Song of the Year: Lee Brice, “I Drive Your Truck”

Male V0calist of the Year: Jason Aldean

Vocal Group of the Year: The Band Perry

Female V0calist of the Year: Miranda Lambert

Album of the Year: Kacey Musgraves’ Same Trailer Different Park

Entertainer of the Year: George Strait

Jack White announces new album, due in June

Hold on to your primary-colored pantaloons — Jack White has announced the release of a second solo album on June 10.

And he’s taking the opportunity once again to teach the world an olde-timey vocab lesson: The album is called Lazarretto, which apparently is also the word for a quarantine station for maritime travelers. A fitting followup to his first post-White Stripes solo outing, 2012′s Blunderbuss, otherwise known as a muzzle-loading firearm.

READ FULL STORY

Frankie Knuckles, 'Godfather of House Music,' dies at 59

Frankie Knuckles, one of dance music’s most formative stars, has died of undisclosed causes. He was 59.

The Bronx-born Francis Nicholls went from a kid riding into the city to hit after-hours spots like Sanctuary and the Loft in the early days of disco to presiding over the Warehouse, the legendary Chicago club that birthed house music (the genre literally got its title from a diminutive of the club’s name).

Knuckles went on to become a prolific DJ, producer, and remixer (for the likes of Michael Jackson, Diana Ross, and Toni Braxton), and held now-iconic residencies at clubs including his own Chicago spot Power Plant, London’s The World, and New York City’s Sound Factory. In 2004, Chicago named a street near the old Warehouse location Frankie Knuckles Way, and in 2005 he was inducted into the Dance Music Hall of Fame.

Knuckles suffered from Type II Diabetes, which may have contributed to his death.

New Michael Jackson album due this May

The King of Pop will be resurrected — at least in the studio. Nearly five years after his death, Michael Jackson’s estate has given Epic Records C.E.O./executive producer L.A. Reid and Timbaland permission to “contemporize” eight previously unreleased tracks for the album Xscape, due May 13.

READ FULL STORY

The xx live at the Armory in New York: On the scene

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There may not be many new tricks in the modern concert handbook (
not good ones, anyway) but it was hard not to feel like a part of something special last night at the xx show at New York’s Park Avenue Armory.

The British dream-pop trio’s run in the historic New York space certainly defies typical rock-show math: 11 nights, each with two 50-minute performances for an audience of no more than 40 people, in a room so enormous (the main hall is 55,000 square feet) that it looks scaled to aircraft carriers, not humans.

In fact, the actual performance space was surprisingly small—at least at first. After being ushered in through a side door into a cramped basement room, the evening’s forty golden-ticket holders were led like obedient hostages through a winding series of sheetrock-dusted corridors and into a modest square that looked like the war room of a Bond villain, with its rubberized floor and black-clad minions. The minions, of course, were the band: Identically poker-faced, angularly coiffed, and completely silent as the audience filed in and were instructed to stand around the perimeter.

“Should we all take our clothes off now?” A friend leaned over and whispered. And it did have a little bit of a Wicker Man-meets-Eyes Wide Shut vibe, as if we were about to witness either a virgin sacrifice or a wild goat orgy. But then the first notes of music rang out: the spare, shimmering guitar line of the band’s 2012 single “Angels.” READ FULL STORY

Kate Bush returning to stage after 35 years

This woman’s work is not done — Kate Bush, twirling alt icon and high priestess of hill running, will return to the stage for the first time since 1979, she announced today.

You’ll have to be British or buy a pretty expensive airplane ticket to see her though; so far, she’s only confirmed 15 concerts at the Hammersmith Apollo in London, beginning Aug. 26.

The singer unofficially retired from touring after just one six-week run in the late ’70s for various reasons, including a fear of flying and the accidental death of her lighting director, 21-year-old Bill Duffield.

According to the London Telegraph, Bush, 55, has become the most popular search term on ticket selling site Viagogo since her announcement, beating out demand for tickets for the likes of Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, and Katy Perry.

The Stooges drummer Scott Asheton dies

Scott Asheton, the drummer for punk icons the Stooges, has died at 64. The immediate cause was not disclosed, but he had suffered a major stroke in 2011 after a live performance in France.

Aside from Iggy Pop, Asheton was the last remaining core member of the band; his older brother Ron, the guitarist, passed away in 2009, and bassist Dave Alexander died in 1975.

The Stooges’ initial run fit the punk-rock ethos of burning bright and fast: They released a trio of now-classic albums beginning with their self-titled debut in 1969 and followed by 1970′s Fun House and 1973′s Raw Power, before breaking up in 1974 in part because of Pop’s heroin addiction.

Scott went on to play drums in Fred “Sonic” Smith’s Sonic Rendezvouz, and later in Scot’s Pirates, Sonny Vincent’s Rat Race Choir, and his own band Rock Action. He rejoined the Stooges in 2003. The group was famously nominated for the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame seven times before finally being inducted in 2010 by fellow Michigan native Madonna.

Pop posted a message on his official Facebook page yesterday: READ FULL STORY

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