The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Category: Books (1-10 of 18)

Jack White ventures into publishing

Third-Man-Books

Jack White’s Third Man Records has made its name on compellingly ambiguous projects that exist in a sort of quantum superposition of established formats: a record store that’s also a recording studio, a box set that’s also a piece of furniture. The company has just announced that it’s moving into the publishing world with the first release from its Third Man Books imprint, and as should be expected, the “book” that it’s putting out isn’t just a book.

Language Lessons: Volume I has its bookish aspects—in particular, a 321-page hardbound anthology of prose and poetry co-edited by poet/musician Chet Weise and Third Man co-founder Ben Swank that includes award-winning writers like Dale Ray Phillips, C.D. Wright, and Adrian Matejka. It also includes five prints of poems illustrated by underground comics artist Jim Blanchard and Tim Kerr, the former guitarist for Texan hardcore pioneers Big Boys. And to take the project to the level of complexity that Third Man is famous for, the “book” also includes a compilation album that includes contributions from such diverse artists as trash-rockers Destruction Unit and legendary avant-jazz saxophonist Ken Vandermark.

The set, which retails for $50, arrives on shelves August 5 and is available for pre-order now.

Check out Darryl 'DMC' McDaniels' new comic book -- EXCLUSIVE

Back in July, Darryl “DMC” McDaniels — one third of legendary hip-hop trio Run DMC — launched Darryl Makes Comics, a new comic book company.

Not only is DMC the CEO, but he’s also the protagonist of the new DMC comic, which is just about to premiere. The book finds McDaniels making the transition from rapper to superhero — just as he did when he made his way from Darryl to DMC.

It’s the long-awaited kickoff of a passion project for McDaniels. “This production is first and foremost respectable and legitimate to comic-book culture,” he told Entertainment Weekly back in July. “The same things DC and Marvel did, the same stories and passion is what this is first. My comic-book passion has always been there, but I never pursued it; but I didn’t want to be a hip-hop dude trying to do a hip-hop comic book.”

Check out the exclusive EW premiere of the first few pages of DMC below.  READ FULL STORY

Clive Davis responds to Kelly Clarkson: 'I had every fact checked'

The cold war of words between longtime music mogul Clive Davis and pop star (and former Davis charge) Kelly Clarkson got a new chapter yesterday.

To recap: In his new autobiography The Soundtrack of My Life, Davis told a handful of stories about the former American Idol champ, which included her weeping during a meeting and not wanting to release smash hits “Since U Been Gone” and “Behind These Hazel Eyes.”

Clarkson responded yesterday with an open letter to her fans, noting that Davis’ “stories and songs are mixed up.” She also said that the only time she ever cried in front of Davis was when he told her he hated the song “Because of You.” READ FULL STORY

Kelly Clarkson responds to Clive Davis: 'His stories ... are mixed up'

Once again, Kelly Clarkson would like to say something to Clive Davis: “Growing up is awesome because you learn you don’t have to cower to anyone — even Clive Davis.”

Some context: in a longish post published this afternoon, Clarkson responds to comments Davis made in his memoir The Soundtrack of My Life, which was released today.

In it, the record executive discusses his tumultuous working relationship with the Idol winner, which began immediately after her victory. He says things like, “Kelly obviously is very talented and has a big, powerful voice,” and that he helped delay the release of From Justin to Kelly in order to help her debut release, Thankful.

But he also claims that Clarkson hated “Since U Been Gone” and “Behind These Hazel Eyes” and “really” wanted both songs off her album.
(The “very tough conversation” was further delayed “when Kelly burst into hysterical sobbing,” Davis writes. “We all just sat there as she cried for several minutes.”) READ FULL STORY

'Experiencing Nirvana': Check out never-before-seen photos of Kurt Cobain on Nirvana's first tour of Europe - EXCLUSIVE

Most of the narratives associated with legendary Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain are steeped in tragedy: He was painfully self-conscious about selling out, suffered from a debilitating undiagnosed stomach ailment, struggled with drugs, and ultimately took his own life, leaving an infant daughter behind.

But all those tales came after Nirvana became the biggest band in the world following the overwhelming success of 1991’s Nevermind. There are plenty of stories to be told about the band prior to its ascendence, when they were just another loud bunch of punk kids from Seattle making noise because it was fun.

One of those narratives arises in Experiencing Nirvana, a new ebook (available Tuesday, November 13) featuring photos and recollections by Bruce Pavitt, who co-founded Sub Pop Records, Nirvana’s original label. The book centers around a series of pictures taken by Pavitt over the course of an eight-day run across Europe in the fall of 1989.

Nirvana was on the road with fellow Sub Poppers Tad, both of whom were on a collision course with Mudhoney as part of the label-curated Lamefest UK at London’s Astoria Theatre. The show ended up being a definitive moment for Nirvana; they managed to capture the attention of the taste-making British music press, an accomplishment that built buzz exponentially and started a domino effect that eventually led to the hugeness of Nevermind.

Pavitt’s photos, taken on the fly with a pocket-sized Olympus, reveal a would-be superstar still in development. READ FULL STORY

Coldplay's 'Hurts Like Heaven' video brings their comic to life -- VIDEO

The music video for Coldplay’s “Hurts Like Heaven” is a prequel to their planned six-part comic-book series, which shares the title of their album Mylo Xyloto, and plays out as the book’s pages are turned. The video depicts a social uprising: A group of superheroes challenges the leader Major Minus and flees from the militaristic police. They’re ultimately caught, but a glimmer of hope survives.

Although I prefer my Coldplay videos with elephants instead of superheroes, the clip’s Orwellian themes and underlying message about the importance of creativity and self-expression make it a win in my book. Even if you had never heard about their comic book, which will be published monthly beginning in February, the video complements the song’s up-beat music and lyrics perfectly, especially the colorful love story.

Watch the video below: READ FULL STORY

Kenny Rogers chats with Stephen Colbert, reveals secrets about Dolly Parton and Charles Barkley in new memoir

Last night on The Colbert Report, country legend Kenny Rogers sat down to discuss his new memoir Luck or Something Like It. At the top of the interview, Colbert ran down Rogers’ resume as a recording artist, and it’s easy to forget how massively successful the guy has been for as long as he has: 120 million albums sold worldwide, a hit in each of the last six decades, and a ranking as the eighth-best-selling male vocal artist of all time (just behind Springsteen, and just in front of Neil Diamond).

Of course, Rogers is an exquisite storyteller, able to get across a range of ideas and emotions in songs like “Lucille” and “The Gambler.” That breezy, conversational tone comes across on the page as well as in conversation with Colbert, which you can check out here.

Here are five other delightful revelations from Luck or Something Like It. READ FULL STORY

Check out the first song from 'For the Sender,' an album based on letters and featuring members of Switchfoot, Nickel Creek, and more

for-the-sender

A few years ago, singer/songwriter Alex Woodard offered a fair trade for his devoted fans: Anybody who pre-ordered his new album and sent him a letter about his or her story would get a free song written specifically about that narrative.

That album came and went, but the letters kept coming. Eventually, Woodard realized that people were sharing incredible stories with him, from tales of grief over lost loved ones to first-hand accounts of post-earthquake Haiti. He showed the letters to some of his musician friends who regularly came over for “family dinners,” and eventually they turned four different letters into 12 different songs.

The result is For the Sender, a book about the letters as well as the loss of Woodard’s beloved dog Kona. It comes with a the accompanying album of songs (plus an extra that Woodard wrote for the late pooch). The lovely results came courtesy of his multi-talented cast of friends, including members of Switchfoot, Nickel Creek, New Found Glory, and the Wallflowers.

The best part? Proceeds from each song will go to a charity of the letter-sender’s choice.

Check out the project’s trailer below. READ FULL STORY

E L James is releasing a 'Fifty Shades of Grey' album

After inspiring a sudden burst in sales of  Thomas Tallis’ choral work “Spem In Alium,” E L James has decided to take the next logical step in building her Fifty Shades of Grey empire: she’s releasing a companion album.

Unlike the Fifty Shades of Grey “soundtrack” playlist listed on the bestselling author’s official site, this record will feature strictly classical music. James has personally selected 15 works from her BDSM blockbuster trilogy (Grey, Fifty Shades Darker, and Fifty Shades Freed) to include on an album to be released by EMI as a digital release on Aug. 15, with a physical version following on Sept. 18.

According to EMI, the album “aims to provide the perfect accompaniment to the Fifty Shades reading experience, setting a mysterious and alluring atmosphere with just the slightest hint of danger…”

In a statement, James said that she was “thrilled that the classical pieces that inspired me while I wrote the Fifty Shades trilogy are being brought together in one collection for all lovers of the books to enjoy.” READ FULL STORY

'Fifty Shades of Grey' mention spikes sales of 16th-century classical composer

fify-shades-of-grey

In addition to single-handedly carrying the publishing world on its candle-wax-scorched back, Fifty Shades of Grey has gone ahead and boosted the music business as well.

According to The Guardian, the mention of a Thomas Tallis choral work called “Spem In Alium” amidst the pages of the finest S&M masterwork since that last thing you read on the Internet has rocketed the piece up the British classical music charts (rocketed being of course a relative term).

The 40-voice epic, composed around 1570 and recorded in 1985, has elbowed chart heavyweight Luciano Pavarotti from the top perch. Go ahead and sample it below.

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP