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Tag: Apple (1-10 of 14)

Bono says glaucoma is the real reason he's always wearing shades

Bono is rarely, if ever, seen without his trademark sunglasses, but the U2 frontman hasn’t worn them to make a fashion statement or define his look—he has been treating his glaucoma.

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U2's new music video is basically the expanded version of that Apple ad

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You know that incessant Apple commercial starring U2 that you haven’t been able to get off your TV? The song’s called “The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone),” and U2 just released a music video for it. That’s right: The video clip that you’ve probably seen more times than any music video since MTV still played the things wasn’t the actual music video.

The “Miracle (of Joey Ramone)” video is just the latest U2 stunt in which the band blurs the line between promotion and performance, like that notorious U2 iPod that came loaded with their discography 10 years ago. That’s because the video is essentially the same Apple ad, but branded as a new music video. The color palette is different, but this expanded version shows Bono and co. dancing against the same plain background, with images of Joey Ramone superimposed on them. Sort of like how you can’t listen to Songs of Innocence without at some point recalling how it emerged from a corporate deal with Apple, you can’t watch this video without recalling that a nearly identical version of it was an actual commercial for the company.

Watch the video below.

Bono on U2's 'Songs of Innocence' auto-download: 'I'm sorry about that'

When U2’s latest album, Songs of Innocence, automatically showed up on thousands of peoples’ iTunes accounts, many were mad. Mad enough that Apple eventually had to make an entire website to help users easily remove the album from their Apple devices.

A month later, U2 is still getting backlash for the move and got a chance to respond in a Facebook interview where someone asked, “Can you please never release an album on iTunes that automatically downloads to peoples’ playlists ever again? It’s really rude.” READ FULL STORY

Apple reportedly shutting down Beats Music (Updated)

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UPDATE: An Apple representative told Recode the TechCrunch report was “not true” but would not elaborate further. Recode also was told by Apple that Beats may go away but that the company would remain invested in music streaming, which would still fall in line with part of TechCrunch‘s earlier report.

ORIGINAL STORY: Apple announced its acquisition of Beats Music and Beats Electronics only five months ago, but a new report suggests that one portion of that purchase may soon be closing its doors.

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Apple launches website to help users delete U2 album from their iTunes

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If you have an iTunes account, you also have U2’s latest album, Songs of Innocence, in your music library—whether you like it or not.

Apple held an event last week where the company announced their new iPhone models and the upcoming iWatch, and where U2 showed up to debut their new surprise album. Turns out, Apple fans didn’t just get some cool news about gadgets that day: Anyone with an Apple ID got U2’s album automatically added to their device. And some people are not happy about that.

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Love it or loathe it? Two EW critics debate U2's new album 'Songs of Innocence'

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Yesterday, U2—easily the biggest rock band left on the planet—surprised everyone when they released their long-in-gestation new album for free.

Songs of Innocence was made available to everybody with an iTunes account, which allows most everybody who listens to digital music to hear it; a physical version will be out on October 14, at which point it will be eligible to chart.

After a solid 12 hours of digesting the record — their first since 2010’s generally disappointing No Line on the Horizon — EW music experts Kyle Anderson and Miles Raymer fired up their e-mail machines, and their critical judgment.  READ FULL STORY

U2 release new album 'Songs of Innocence' for free on iTunes

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U2 will release their 13th album as a free download for iTunes subscribers, the band announced at today’s massive Apple event, where the Cupertino tech giant revealed its new iPhone models and Apple Watch. Actually, they already released it.

Apple CEO Tim Cook closed out the company’s annual mobile product unveiling by introducing a live performance by the Irish rockers and revealing that Songs of Innocence is now available on the iTunes Store as a free download to anyone with an account on the service. With an estimated 500 million users already signed up, it could quite easily become U2’s biggest record to date.

 

It's official: Apple owns Beats

Apple has closed its $3 billion deal to buy Beats. Announced a month ago, the deal is Apple’s biggest acquisition ever. It gives the company ownership of Beats Music, a music streaming service, and Beats Electronics, the headphone manufacturer.

“Today we are excited to officially welcome Beats Music and Beats Electronics to the Apple family,” Apple said in a post. Beats co-founders Jimmy Lovine and Dr. Dre will be joining Apple. Apple paid $2.6 billion in cash for the property, with an additional $400 million in equity. The computing giant is expected to push Beats’ music streaming service to compete with similar services from competitors like Google and Amazon.

European Union antitrust regulators approved the deal a few days ago. Apple plans to cut about 200 jobs from Beats due to overlaps between the two companies.

The great irony of Silicon Valley's curated-music craze

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The music industry has always chased trends, and as tech companies have started getting into the game, they’ve not only picked up the habit but taken it to an unimaginably expensive level—one that makes the most coke-fueled excesses of the Fleetwood Mac era look miserly in comparison. And right now, the market is going bananas for curation: After years of investing in algorithms that can figure out that someone who likes the Beatles would probably also be interested in Creedence Clearwater Revival, which has helped the online radio behemoth Pandora claim 250 million users, the tide has turned. “Curation” is now the buzzword du jour.

Yesterday, word got out that Google will be buying the playlist site Songza for a “substantially higher” amount than the $15 million it was previously rumored to have offered, according to a Billboard article. Songza offers users, in its own words, “Music Curated by Music Experts”—that is, playlists broken down not only by genre but by mood or compatibility with different activities, some of them as specific as “Lounging in a Cool Hotel” or “Hanging Out in the Man Cave.” The tech giant has plans to fold Songza and its team of 50 or so curators into the unwieldily named Google Play Music All Access, a subscription-based streaming platform it launched to compete against Spotify that hasn’t offered very serious competition so far.

Apple also recently acquired a curation service: the Beats Music platform, whose place in the $3 billion acquisition has been massively overshadowed by Beats’ much larger and more profitable hardware division. Now that Apple and Google have both bought their own curation services, other companies will most likely be scrambling to get their own. READ FULL STORY

The music streaming wars are starting to heat up

The past decade of music retail have been dominated by two things: the MP3 and Apple. But an ever-expanding field of new digital platforms are changing all of that by offering huge libraries of music available in all-you-can-eat plans — which make the idea of buying MP3s suddenly seem as outdated as buying CDs seemed when the first iPod dropped in 2001. There’s a war brewing over the market for music streaming, as well as the subscription fees these companies are hoping you’ll pay for it. As industry giants like Apple and Amazon have begun joining the battle, things are starting to heat up.

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