The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: George Jones (1-10 of 11)

CMA Awards: Best and Worst of the Broadcast

The real winners were announced Wednesday night at the 47th Annual Country Music Association Awards. But here are a few more honors from the telecast you should feel free to weigh in on:

Best “Suck it, haters” Taylor Swift moment ever: So not only did George Strait, Keith Urban, Tim McGraw, Faith Hill, Brad Paisley, and Rascal Flatts — all people for whom Swift opened at the start of her career — come out onstage to present the 23-year-old with the Pinnacle Award, there was also a video including kind messages from Mick Jagger, Justin Timberlake, Carly Simon, Julia Roberts, and Ethel Kennedy, among others. Watch it below. It’s might have been the best acceptance speech of Swift’s career, as she paid respect to each of the artists onstage with her.  READ FULL STORY

CMA Awards co-host Brad Paisley talks preparations, George Jones tribute, and poking fun at country-music feuds

For the sixth straight year, Brad Paisley and Carrie Underwood will cohost the CMA Awards, airing tonight at 8 p.m. ET on ABC. (See our predictions for who we think will win, and who we’d vote for.)

There’s a long list of performances, which include Taylor Swift collaborating with Alison Krauss and Vince Gill, Dave Grohl joining the Zac Brown Band,  and George Strait and Alan Jackson paying tribute to the late, great George Jones. Back in August, when Paisley began talking to exec producer Robert Deaton about this year’s show, one of their first conversations was about how the broadcast would honor Jones. “It ought to be the best you can have with those two doing it,” Paisley told EW last month. “They’re the heirs to the torch. If anybody’s close to the stratosphere that George Jones was cruising in, it’s them. That’s who it needs to be.”

Fans will also tune in to see what Paisley and Underwood come up with for their opening monologue. When we spoke to Paisley, he expected them to have fun with the genre’s current identity crisis, epitomized by Brown referring to Entertainer of the Year nominee and fellow performer Luke Bryan’s bro-country chart-topper ”That’s My Kind of Night” as ”the worst song I’ve ever heard.” ”You’ve got people in our industry all fired up on each side of that issue, and then you’ve got me — I’m just happy about it,” Paisley says, laughing. ”It’s like I’m this sadist when we’re writing this show. I’m like, ‘Oh, that looks painful… That’s great!”  READ FULL STORY

Naomi Judd slams CMT Awards for 'by the way' George Jones tribute

In a letter to Nashville newspaper The Tennesseean, country singer Naomi Judd took aim at last week’s CMT Music Awards, ripping the ceremony for not staying true to country music — and for short changing George Jones’ death with an undercooked tribute.

“George Jones is to country music what The Beatles are to pop, the Rolling Stones to rock, Elvis to rockabilly, Mozart to classical and Aretha to soul,” Judd wrote. “Yet, the ‘Country’ Music Television awards show allowed only a ‘by the way’ mention of Jones’ death and legacy.”

“Incongruously, [CMT] chose alternative music group the Mavericks to perform their short version of George’s ‘The Race Is On,'” Judd continued.

Judd wasn’t just bothered by the George Jones tribute, though. She also criticized genre-bending performances, alluding to Florida Georgia Line and Nelly’s rendition of “Cruise.” READ FULL STORY

CMT Awards: Best and worst of the broadcast

CMT-MIRANDA-LAMBERT.jpg

The real winners were announced last night at the 2013 CMT Music Awards, a fan-voted program that technically honors country-music videos. Still, here are a few more honors from the unremarkable telecast you should feel free to weigh in on:

Worst hosts: With dead eyes and a stiff posture, Jason Aldean left returnee Kristen Bell to once again try way too hard to elicit laughter from the crowd. Their ongoing gag about which duet to sing together (a thinly veiled attempt to get people to use the #CMTawards hashtag) was downright painful — and frequent teleprompter issues didn’t help. These two were no Brad and Carrie. They were no Blake and Reba, either. Heck, they were no Blake and Luke — and that’s saying something. READ FULL STORY

Performers and speakers announced for George Jones' funeral, plus how to watch it

Plans have been announced for George Jones’ public funeral, taking place Thursday at The Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville. The service will include music from Brad Paisley, Alan Jackson, Randy Travis, Vince Gill and Patty Loveless, Charlie Daniels, The Oak Ridge Boys, Kid Rock, Ronnie Milsap, Travis Tritt, Tanya Tucker, and Wynonna. Kenny Chesney will speak, as will Former First Lady Laura Bush, Grand Ole Opry VP&GM Pete Fisher, Governor Bill Haslam, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, Barbara Mandrell, and CBS News’ Chief Washington Correspondent Bob Schieffer.

The service, which will begin at 11 a.m. ET, will be broadcast live on CMT, GAC, RFD, and FamilyNet, as well as local Nashville stations. Those not near a TV can watch online at opry.com., or listen in at wsmonline.com or by tuning their radio dials to WSM 650AM and SiriusXM Willie’s Roadhouse (Ch. 56).

Read more:
George Jones tributes: Brad Paisley, Jimmy Buffett, Alan Jackson, and more play covers — VIDEO
George Jones: The Essential Playlist — LISTEN
Goodbye, Possum: The Oak Ridge Boys’ Joe Bonsall remembers George Jones
Legendary country star George Jones is dead at 81

George Jones tributes: Brad Paisley, Jimmy Buffett, Alan Jackson, and more play covers -- VIDEO

Since the April 26 passing of George Jones, country music artists and fans have been in mourning. But as we all know, music heals, which is why set-lists included tributes to the Possum over the weekend. Here are some that have made their way to YouTube. Jones’ funeral will take place May 2, at The Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville, and be open to the public.

Brad Paisley, “Bartender’s Blues,” “The Race Is On,” “She Thinks I Still Care,” “This is Country Music” (his song, with new Jones-centric lyrics)

READ FULL STORY

George Jones: The Essential Playlist -- LISTEN

George Jones, who died today at 81, left behind an enormous body of work to sift through and enjoy. Here’s a smattering from his half-century-plus recording career to get you started. (You can also stream the full list at Spotify, after the jump.)

“White Lightning” (1959)
His first No. 1 song was an ode to bootleg booze—and fittingly, according to his 1996 autobiography, I Lived to Tell It All, it took him 80 takes to record vocals during a drunken day in the studio.

“Love Bug” (1965)
One of his more rockin’ hits captures the playful side of “the Possum” and features backup vocals by Jones protégé and bandmate Johnny Paycheck.

“The Door” (1974)
Another No. 1, on which Jones lists the most awful sounds he’s ever heard (“the sound of my dear old mama crying/And the sound of the train that took me off to war”)—but nothing hurts as bad as “that lonely sound, the closing of the door” when the girl he loves walks out of his life.

“These Days (I Barely Get By)” (1974)
One of the great low-down, everything-that-can-possibly-go-wrong-is-going-wrong songs.

“Golden Ring” (1976)
This No. 1 duet with Tammy Wynette (whom he divorced 14 months before the song’s release) tracks a wedding ring from a Chicago pawnshop to its new home with a happy young couple and eventually, when their marriage falls apart, its journey back to the pawnshop.

“I Ain’t Got No Business Doin’ Business Today” (1978)
In which Jones extols the virtues of playing hooky to make whoopee. READ FULL STORY

Goodbye, Possum: The Oak Ridge Boys' Joe Bonsall remembers George Jones

To honor George Jones, EW asked the Oak Ridge Boys’ Joe Bonsall to recall his fondest memories of the country legend, who died today at the age of 81. They include the time Jones told Bonsall he should’ve just kicked his ass — and hearing “He Stopped Loving Her Today” before its release.

By: Joe Bonsall

As fate might have it, last night at a show in Missouri someone yelled from the audience, “How is George Jones doing?”

Well, we had no answer. We were well aware that George was in the hospital again and had been there since the middle of the month, but for some reason we thought he was doing all right but we did not know for sure. We all looked at each other on stage after the question in wonder… Each man’s face registered concern at NOT knowing the answer.

Then we arrived home this morning and heard the sad news that the Possum has gone home. How very sad. What an incredible and devastating loss for all who knew him, respected him, admired him, and loved him.

So many memories come to mind. A young Joey Bonsall once driving from Philadelphia to Youngstown, Ohio in a ’59 Ford all alone… to see George Jones and Tammy Wynette. He was a bit on the edge that night (being kind), and I remember being mad at him. As a young man who was in total love with Tammy, I perceived him to be a bit disrespectful of her onstage and I considered waiting for him at the stage door to tell him so… but I just drove all night back home.

I told him that story years later, and he told me I should have just kicked his ass and we both laughed.  READ FULL STORY

Missing George Jones -- and other late icons we never got to see live

The word “legend” gets thrown around a lot in music, but when you’re talking country great George Jones, it fits.

Jones, who died this morning at age 81 after being hospitalized April 18, was in the midst of his goodbye tour, and I was supposed to see him in June for the first time — a concert that had been postponed from last summer, when he canceled shows for health reasons.

Never having seen him live will remain one of my biggest regrets. While I console myself with some YouTube videos below, tell me who you wish you’d been able to see in concert before the opportunity was lost. READ FULL STORY

Legendary country star George Jones is dead at 81

Country music icon George Jones — a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame and a legend of the Grand Old Opry — died today in Nashville, where he had been hospitalized for more than a week with fever and irregular blood pressure. He was 81.

His recording career spanned more than 50 years, kick-started with his 1959 hit, “White Lightning.” He charted more than 160 singles, a record in pop-music history that still stands. Over the decades, Jones worked with Mercury Records, United Artists, Epic Records, and MCA, as well as producers and songwriters including Billy Sherrill and Bobby Braddock, who were often behind Jones’ series of duets with his then-wife Tammy Wynette — “Golden Ring,” “Near You,” and “We’re Gonna Hold On.”

Jones and Wynette’s tumultuous professional and personal relationship became a defining dynamic in country music, and his personal struggles with drugs and alcohol were also well documented; he later credited second wife Nancy Jones with helping him to reach and maintain his sobriety for the last three decades of his life. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP