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Tag: Indie Rock (11-20 of 696)

Dirt Dress's 'Revelations' video is an ode to portable electronics and feral cats

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Unless you’re a potamologist, when you hear the words “Los Angeles” you probably think about hellish traffic and fantastic taco stands before you think of bodies of water. But the Los Angeles River flows right through the middle of town and provides some of the many surreal juxtapositions of car-centric urbanization and raw nature that L.A. has to offer.

In the video for Dirt Dress‘s “Revelations,” directed by artist Ben Jeans Houghton, local scenester Diva Dompe explores the river and the wildlife living around it (including a colony of feral cats) with a shimmering postpunk soundtrack on her Walkman.

Dirt Dress’s Revelations EP is out now on Future Gods.

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Wild Smiles' 'Another Year Older' is a slice of grunge-pop heaven

There are a lot of bands trying to do the ’90s thing right now, but few do it as effectively or efficiently as Winchester, England’s Wild Smiles.

Their new single “Another Year Older” skillfully jams together a handful of distinct alt-rock styles from the time, from grunge to Britpop to shoegaze, into one four-minute mass of post-adolescent angst and heroically distorted guitars.

If EW‘s endorsement’s not enough for you, consider the fact that Portishead’s Geoff Barrow is not only a fan of the band but even released their first EP on his own label. And that guy’s a certified genius.

Their new album Always Tomorrow is out today.

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TWICEYOUNG gives off dreamy electro vibes on 'Stay the Same'

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Nashville trio TWICEYOUNG has the chiming guitars and sweet hooks of an indie rock band, the synthesized sounds of an electronic project, and a sweeping cinematic sensibility that’s probably making film and TV music supervisors exceptionally happy.

Their new EP Prefer You drops on Nov. 11 and with the frequency that they’ve been appearing on music blogs it already seems destined to be a cult sensation, if not something bigger. In the lead-up to its release, they’re sharing “Stay the Same,” a cool blend of postpunk and dream pop that sounds like the slightly more gothed-out cousin of Drive soundtrack sensations Electric Youth.

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Stream singer-songwriter Pisces' luminous new LP

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On much of her self-titled debut LP, singer-songwriter Sarah Negahdari–the front person for the band Happy Hollows who also records under the name Pisces–sounds something like an L.A.-ified reincarnation of Nick Drake, with the same delicate, dreamy take on folk music but sunny Laurel Canyon vibes taking the place of Drake’s very British gloom. The Pisces LP, featuring the hard-to-shake single “Being With You,” came out last week. You can stream it here or buy it on Bandcamp.

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It's ghouls' night out in Johnny Aries' 'This Grave Is My Bed Tonight' video

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Last year, erstwhile Two Wounded Birds front man Johnny Aries moved from London to New York in order to join up with his former tour mates The Drums. Along with playing on their most recent album, Encyclopedia, Aries has also written and recorded his first solo LP, Unbloomedsince his relocation.

Combining punchy pop with a bit of gothy postpunk edge, it’s like a trip back in time to the period in the ’80s where alternative youth culture was ruled by swooning, floppy-haired Smiths fans.

The video for its lead single, “This Grave Is My Bed Tonight,” underlines that aspect by slapping some vampiric makeup on Aries and friends and sending them out onto the streets of New York.

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Naomi Punk's 'Television Man' gets a hypnotic, hypermuscular video

Last month Olympia, Washington weirdos Naomi Punk released Television Man, 10 tracks of jagged postpunk, Pacific Northwest grunge, and art-damaged sonic experimentation that’s as genuinely pleasurable as it is challenging. The title track is also maybe the album’s best, a hypnotic, mathy prog-punk anthem with touches of krautrock drive and almost New Age-y prismatic psychedelia.

The kaleidoscopic video for “Television Man” takes a slightly literal approach to visualizing the song with degraded videotape of flexing bodybuilders, but blasts the images into abstraction through repetition and reflection. “Basically,” writes director Robin Stein, “it came from an initial interest in using mirrors as an analog effect for manipulating video imagery. Beyond the initial visual treatment—inspired by imagery of 1970s body-building and the Philip Lorca Dicorcia photography series ‘Lucky 13’—I was looking at how the contours of extreme musculature could become an abstract and dark visual medium.”

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'The Goonies' meets 'The X-Files' in Rich Aucoin's 'Want to Believe' video

Halifax indie-pop auteur Rich Aucoin‘s second album, Ephemeral, was heavily inspired by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince, and was in fact written specifically to sync up with the novella’s 1979 claymation film adaptation. For the video for the song “Want to Believe,” though, he seems to be tapping into a couple other beloved entertainment properties, pairing a ragtag gang of BMX-riding, adventure-seeking misfits with a burnt-out guy in a rumpled suit who has an obsession with exploring the unknown and a very familiar UFO poster on the wall. The wacky hijinks the group gets up to go nicely with the song’s fist-pumping, Andrew-W.K.-meets-The-Arcade-Fire positivity.

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The Rentals' Matt Sharp talks new record and living in Weezer's shadow

In 1995, when Weezer bassist Matt Sharp released the first album by his side project The Rentals, he was at the peak of an alt-rock explosion that was reaching its apex, and with the smash success of “Friends of P,” he was positioned as one of the music industry’s golden boys. Then he quit Weezer, split to Europe, and recorded a moody concept album about being a famous rock star drifting through Europe (1999’s Seven More Minutes) that failed to reach “Friends of P” levels of popularity. Sharp then dissolved the band and dropped out of the public eye, popping up here and there with art projects and oddball, small-scale recordings.

Recently Sharp recruited a new team of Rentals, including Black Keys drummer Patrick Carney, and recorded Lost in Alphaville, a long-awaited return to form that was enthusiastically received by the fervent cult following that his project has grown over the years. During a stop in New York City he spoke with EW about the new album, his admiration for film directors, and the long shadow that Weezer’s first album still casts over his career.

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Get a taste of synesthesia with Deep Sea Diver's vibrant 'One by One' video

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Jessica Dobson has spent the past few years as a guitarist for hire, with a résumé that includes stints playing with Beck, The Shins, The Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Spoon, and The Divine Fits. Deep Sea Diver is her outlet for her own music, which trades the jangly guitars of the bands she’s been playing with for a more electronics-based sound and a songwriting style that combines quirky indie-pop with more dance floor-oriented stuff.

The video for the band’s new single “One by One” from their recent EP Always Waiting was directed by its drummer (and Dobson’s husband) Peter Mansen. It’s Mansen’s first attempt at shooting a music video but it has an interesting concept: Those large fields of color throughout it were chosen by fans of the band who have a type of synesthesia that lets them experience different sounds as specific colors. The dancer is Mansen’s younger brother, who combines a 6’10” frame with a very unique dance style.

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21 thoughts on 21 years of the Afghan Whigs' masterpiece 'Gentlemen'

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When I first started this job back in April 2011, I was subjected to an EW tradition: I was sent a list of questions whose answers made up an office-wide introduction to my cultural obsessions. When it came time to express an all-time favorite from the music world, I settled on the one name I always shout out whenever anybody asks me what songwriter I defend above all others: Greg Dulli.

Dulli has made excellent work I have absolutely adored in several different guises, including the Twilight Singers, the Gutter Twins, and the Backbeat Band. But he got started with the Afghan Whigs, a mercurial indie rock/R&B hybrid from Cincinnati who first appeared on the scene with the haunting Big Top Halloween in 1988 and wrapped up their original run with 1998’s 1965. (They recently reconstituted for an ongoing series of shows and the brand new album Do To The Beast, which came out earlier this year.) Their masterpiece is, undoubtedly, their 1993 major-label debut Gentlemen, which is getting the deluxe reissue treatment today in the form of Gentlemen at 21. The new version contains a remastered version of the original record, plus a second disc of demos, B-sides, and live tracks that further flesh out the strange and wonderful universe the band helped create more than two decades ago.

Gentlemen has been a cornerstone album for the better part of its existence (and, subsequently, mine), so in honor of this definitive work now being able to legally order a boilermaker, here are 21 thoughts about Gentlemen. READ FULL STORY

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