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Tag: Marilyn Manson (1-10 of 10)

Avril Lavigne's new self-titled album, streaming today: Read EW's review

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Avril Lavigne, Avril Lavigne (Epic)

Avril Lavigne’s twice-married, pushing 30—and speaking for sloppy teens like the Lorax who grabbed the axe. We’re supposed to hope for more from a star releasing her fifth album (which is streaming now on iTunes, a week ahead of its release), never mind one doing it at a time when even music’s biggest brats get folks clucking about high-toned topics like appropriation and blasphemy.

Avril, who turned 29 last month, can’t compete with Miley and Kanye when it comes to making a spectacle of pop spectacle. But the irresistibly zippy, perceptive and, on two (possibly three) occasions, deeply weird Avril Lavigne reminds us that maturity sometimes means doubling down on what’s expected of you—even when that involves rapping about the “motherf—ing cops” on a fleet little song called “Bitchin’ Summer.”

READ FULL STORY

Depeche Mode's Dave Gahan on 'Delta Machine,' inspiring Frank Ocean, and what his band has in common with Led Zeppelin

Depeche Mode just released their 13th album Delta Machine, their strongest outing of the 21st century. Though they’ve been at it for over three decades, they show few signs of slowing and remain as relevant as ever: They’re constantly being covered (“Just Can’t Get Enough,” the band’s first single, showed up this season on Glee), and as frontman Dave Gahan points out, also regularly providing inspiration for a new generation of boundary-pushing artists.

EW: Your new album Delta Machine was made both in New York, where you live, and in California where Martin Gore has his studio. How does Depeche Mode work being a bi-coastal operation?
Dave Gahan: Depeche Mode is a bit of a revolving door when it comes to other people that work on our record since Alan Wilder left the band 20 years ago. We’ve had to adapt to different ways of working on things. This time we worked with Chris Berg who is a Swedish musician, and he’s worked with bands like Fever Ray and the Knife. He does sort of hardcore electronic stuff. He fit right in, he knew exactly what he was doing, he was very bold, he had great ideas. Martin and I both need a different angle, and that’s what makes it interesting. But to answer your question, yes, Martin’s out there in California, I’m here in New York, so basically we just the recording in half. He has a nice studio in his house, too. This record was really kind of a pleasure to make with Martin. He’s in great shape, he’s writing great songs. He’s as positive as we get as musicians. We’ve come a long way together, we see our strengths and we’ve come to this place where we have a very strong musical bond. I think that just happens with time. Being in a band, you spend the first 10 years chasing something. You spend the next 10 years trying to hold onto it. We’ve spent the last 10 years just kind of doing our own thing. I think there’s a great strength in having the courage and also having the support to do what you want to do when you’re an artist in any way shape or form. And we’ve been lucky to have some great people working with us.

You say you and Martin are positive, but Delta Machine is still pretty dark. Where does that come from?
That’s just in us. READ FULL STORY

Halloween begs the question: Where are all the scary pop stars?

A few weeks back, I took in the Twins of Evil Tour, a jaunt that features Marilyn Manson and Rob Zombie as the co-headliners. As noted in my recap of the show, the thing that separates Zombie’s performance from Manson’s is that the former never demanded to be taken seriously, while the latter’s peak occurred precisely because people took him at face value.

It’s an important distinction, because it ultimately allowed for Manson to be much bigger during the height of his power. And that was considerable power: Between the premiere of the video for “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)” and the release of Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death), Manson was a headline-grabbing, TRL-dominating, album-selling dynamo who, it could be argued, was the most relevant rock star of the late 1990s.

Few people making guitar-based music inspired as much conversation, outrage, intrigue, and passionate fandom as Manson. Though it’s easy to see now that his mainstreaming was calculated (facilitated in part by the edge-smoothing of producer, label boss, and collaborator Trent Reznor), it’s still impressive that Manson managed to sell nearly two million copies of an EP of remixes of songs that nobody bought the first time around, three covers, and a recording of a phone call titled “May Cause Discoloration of the Urine or Feces.”

Manson snuck into the pop consciousness during the vacuum period created following the death of Kurt Cobain in 1994. Those three or four years are some of the most fascinating in rock history, as without a figurehead to show the world the way, every weirdo crashes the stage all at once. READ FULL STORY

On the scene: Rob Zombie and Marilyn Manson celebrate Halloween early in New York

About a quarter of the way through his set at New York’s Hammerstein Ballroom on Wednesday night, metal veteran and horror film director Rob Zombie paused to address the audience. “It’s a shame we couldn’t be here on Halloween,” he growled to the crowd. “But we figured it was close enough.”

Zombie could give that same speech every day of the year. Like Marilyn Manson—his co-headliner on what is being touted as the “Twins of Evil Tour”—he’s spent the better part of his life in costume, assuming the role of deranged barker at the center of a carnival obsessed with ancient monster movies, Z-list actresses’ breasts, and the whimsy of the devil himself.

Though the two scary men at the center of each hour-ish–long set may seem interchangeable, their performances were deeply distinct, both sonically and philosophically.  READ FULL STORY

Johnny Depp plays guitar on stage with Marilyn Manson for 'Sweet Dreams': Watch it here!

The guest list for Wednesday night’s Revolver Golden Gods Awards wasn’t particularly glamorous, as it featured mostly stars from the heavy metal community. There was one exception, however, as Johnny Depp — he of Hollywood red carpets and “Sexiest Man in the World” awards — dropped in to share the stage with Marilyn Manson on a run through the band’s first big hit: a cover of Eurythmics’ “Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This).”

Depp began the song on stage at Los Angeles’ Nokia Theater rather incognito, but frontman Manson gave away his special guest. “If you don’t recognize my personal friend, my personal savior, my personal guitar hero, Johnny Depp!” he told the crowd.

Check out “Sweet Dreams” below. READ FULL STORY

Lana Del Rey gets a tribute from John Mayer, probably isn't dating Axl Rose

Like Jason Voorhees and Rick Santorum, Lana Del Rey never stops coming back. Every time you think she’s about to slip out of the conversation for good, she sneaks back in.

Last time, she gave herself a boost by performing “Video Games” on American Idol. This time, she got a shout out from John Mayer, the now-mute guitar hero who recorded an echo-filled, guitar-only cover of “Video Games.” It’s spare and lovely without being laborious. (If Mayer’s voice is gone for good, he can still have a career crafting instrumental versions of already popular songs).

Check out the recording below (which was originally posted to Mayer’s Tumblr). READ FULL STORY

Marilyn Manson and Johnny Depp finally release song together — and it's a Carly Simon cover

When Marilyn Manson recently released his new single “No Reflection,” we wondered whether he was still scary — or even relevant.

Likewise, one could ask a similar question about Johnny Depp: Is he still cool?

We’re not sure, but we do know that Captain Jack is teaming up with the “Beautiful People” singer to release a duet cover of Carly Simon’s “You’re So Vain,” which fans(?) will be able to hear on Manson’s upcoming album Born Villain.

If the project sounds like some oddball, Jack White-meets-ICP-style pairing, think again — Depp and Manson are actually real-life buddies who attend movie premieres together and stuff.

They’ve even been known to go to each other’s houses to compare their funky hat collections. OK, fine, we can’t say for sure that that’s actually true… but we also can’t say for sure that it’s not true.

READ FULL STORY

Marilyn Manson returns with new single 'No Reflection': Is he still scary?

Marilyn Manson is back with a new album called Born Villain, and the first single “No Reflection” just dug itself out of a shallow grave to walk the Earth.

Manson hasn’t been gone for very long (the band’s last album, The High End of Low, came out in 2009), but it has been a while since he has been a significant part of the pop culture conversation. The last time the group’s titular singer made a big impact was with 2003’s The Golden Age of Grotesque, and even then it seemed like the seams were showing and the decline was inevitable (though it should be noted that The Golden Age of Grotesque is wildly underrated, with a number of never-were anthems like “Ka-Boom Ka-Boom”).

There was also a moment when the video for “Heart-Shaped Glasses” looked like the return of scandalous Manson, but it was processed by the online news machine in a day and pretty much never heard from again. Considering the relatively small venues booked on Marilyn Manson’s upcoming tour, they seem closer to becoming the door-to-door fear factory once lampooned in The Onion.

But is “No Reflection” the way back for Manson, both the band and the man? The guitars are still loud, the beat still propulsive, and the chorus pretty melodic. Give it a listen below. READ FULL STORY

'Everybody Hurts': the new video for Simon Cowell's Haiti-relief song will make you cry

Last week, dozens of bold-faced names gathered to sing a new edition of “We Are the World,” but the music industry’s outpouring of support for the devastation in Haiti doesn’t stop there. The star-studded, Simon Cowell-produced remake of the R.E.M. classic, “Everybody Hurts,” hit U.K. radio last week. The song is melancholy and inspiring, especially considering the contributions from such folks as diverse as Leona Lewis, Miley Cyrus, Mariah Carey, Susan Boyle, Rod Stewart, and Jon Bon Jovi. But it’s the recently released video, which is filled with tragic images from the mess in Haiti, that will get your waterworks really going:

How many times during that six minutes did you whip out your cell phone and text $10 for Haitian relief? Yah, that’s what I thought. I can’t wait to see my cell phone bill this month.

But, Music Mixers, what are you thinking of this R.E.M. remake? Are does it move you to give? Buy? Do you think that this is better than the forthcoming “We Are the World” remake will be?

(Follow the Music Mix on Twitter: @EWMusicMix.)

More from EW.com’s Music Mix:
Super Bowl goes indie: Arcade Fire, Grizzly Bear soundtrack ads
Super Bowl XLIV halftime show: Were the Who football wizards?
Carrie Underwood’s Super Bowl ‘National Anthem’
Ke$ha did not vandalize the Hollywood Sign, officials confirm. Come on.
Frances Bean Cobain to make recording debut
Kelly Clarkson responds to Taylor Swift’s record-label defense: ‘Take a lesson’

Eminem holds onto No. 1 on the albums chart as Marilyn Manson, Wisin & Yandel, and Grizzly Bear crack the Top 10

Marilyn_manson_l He may have gotten (willingly) pranked at the MTV Movie Awards this weekend, but Eminem is nobody's fool on the Billboard 200 albums chart. His Relapse held on tight to the No. 1 spot in its second week, selling another 211,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan — nearly three times as many as this week's runner-up, Green Day's 21st Century Breakdown. Another week like this and Em will have topped a million units moved in under a month. Now that he's back, it seems Shady isn't going anywhere.

The week's next highest debut went to Marilyn Manson, whose The High End of Low bowed at No. 4 with 49,000 copies sold. That's a — gasp! — respectable number for an aging shock-rocker. Puerto Rican reggaeton duo Wisin & Yandel opened at No. 7 with 36,000 copies sold of La Revolucion, which I am totally going to check out now that I know it exists. ("Rakata" used to be my jam!)

Next up, Grizzly Bear's Veckatimest bowed at No. 8 with 33,000 copies sold. Wait, let me say that again: Grizzly Bear debuted in the Top 10!!! I've been doing my minor part to help spread the word about this fantastic indie album for many a month, as have legions of other critics and fans, so I hope it's not presumptuous of me to feel a little proud to see all that buzz paying off. It couldn't happen to a more deserving record. Just to review, Grizzly Bear sold more albums this week than either Taylor Swift (No. 9) or Rascal Flatts (No. 10). Wonderful.

Elsewhere in charting debuts, Montgomery Gentry landed at No. 11 with 26,000 copies sold of For Our Heroes, which was available for purchase only at Cracker Barrel restaurant/stores. (Yep, Grizzly Bear sold more than the Cracker Barrel exclusive country album, too.) And that was it for new entries to the Top 20 this week. What's your take on this week's sales results? How long do you think Eminem can keep his No. 1 run going? And are any of you as pleasantly surprised by Grizzly Bear's performance as I am?

More from EW's Music Mix:
Eminem trounces the competition in a crowded week
Grizzly Bear takes a victory lap in New York City
Saturday video roundup: Phoenix, Modest Mouse and Marilyn Manson
What 'grown up' songs do your kids love?

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