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Tag: Music Videos (31-40 of 709)

Robyn and Royksopp float through space in 'Monument' video

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Forget yoga retreats in the mountains—judging from Robyn and Röyksopp’s video for “Monument,” space is the place to go for all your meditating needs.

Robyn and the members of Norwegian duo Röyksopp float on a white circle through space, occasionally getting up to dance in slow motion and stare at each other in wonder. The dazed video reflects the dreaminess of “Monument,” a track more ethereal than the dance-pop Robyn’s known for.

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Ariana Grande brings intergalactic excitement to 'Break Free' video

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If you’ve ever wanted to watch a combination of Britney Spears’ “Oops!… I Did It Again,” Star Wars, Gravity, Guardians of the Galaxy, and Transformers, Ariana Grande just made your wish come true: Her music video for “Break Free” is all that and more, with the “more” being missiles jetting out of her boobs.
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Ryan Adams teams up with Elvira for 'Gimme Something Good' video

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Ryan Adams has basically three distinct phases of his creative process, and he’s been bouncing back and forth between them for his entire solo career. When he’s not dropping entirely out of the public eye to the point where people start to wonder if he’s finally completely lost the thread, he’s releasing wacko projects that make people start to feel pretty confident about their suspicions. And when he’s not busy doing either of those he simply puts out music that reaffirms his position as one of the few truly great roots-rock troubadours left.

Judging by his latest single, “Gimme Something Good,” he’s currently in the latter mood. With its clipped blues guitar figure, haunting organ, and anxious vocal line, the song feels like his homage to Fleetwood Mac, and it’s one of the best things he’s released in recent memory.

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Priory's 'Weekend' is keeping the arena-rock anthem alive

Recent pop history has been notably light on the kind of epically-scaled rock anthems built for fist-pumping, arena-shaking singalongs that dominated the radio throughout the ’80s and ’90s. Portland duo Priory is singlehandedly reversing that trend with their song “Weekend,” which for the past month has been slowly gaining momentum on radio and seems destined to go onto even bigger things.

Brandon Rush and Kyle Sears met at shows around Portland, but the idea to collaborate musically didn’t come until Rush moved into a punk house that Sears was living in. “We just sat down for the first time with acoustic guitars and it was kind of instantaneous,” Sears says. “Literally I think the first time we sat down we wrote the foundations for like two songs.”

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CHVRCHES bring 'Mother We Share' to Guitar Center Sessions

The eighth season of the DirectTV-based concert series Guitar Center Sessions has leaned heavily on ’90s acts like Soundgarden, Alice in Chains, Damon Albarn, and Snoop Dogg, but for its penultimate episode they’ve brought in a group that’s only just started to bloom. This Sunday, Aug. 10, the show will feature Scottish trio CHVRCHES, whose debut LP, The Bones of What You Believe, has been steadily accumulating fans since it was released last fall, making them one of the more popular acts in the electropop revolution that’s leapt up from the indie underground and started taking over the pop charts.

Here’s a first look at their performance of “Mother We Share,” one of the standout songs from a catalog that’s full of exceptional pop hooks and delicious electronic production.

Hustle and Drone live out their hoop dreams in 'The Glow' video

Ryan Neighbors played keyboards for the proggy rock band Portugal. The Man until 2012, when he left to form the synth-heavy power trio Hustle and Drone. After a spending the past couple years woodshedding in Portland, the group is preparing to release their first LP, HOLYLAND, September 2 on Red Bull Sound Select.

The album’s lead single, “The Glow,” has the fist-pumping energy of an arena-rock anthem, so it makes sense that the group shot its video in the Moda Center, home to the Portland Trail Blazers, fulfilling what Neighbors calls “a childhood dream.” The clip features high-flying, slam-dunking luchadores and a whole lot of fake blood, not to mention enough synthesizers to stock a Guitar Center keyboard section.

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Get familiar with the summer's two biggest dance crazes

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If you don’t spend much time listening to independently produced regional rap music, you’d be forgiven for thinking that songs that spawn particular dance crazes died out somewhere around the time Fat Joe reimagined the dance-song format as a PSA against dancing itself. In fact, the form remains alive—even healthy—in generally isolated pockets of black youth culture. It may not be generating the kind of globe-sweeping phenomena as the Twist or the Macarena, but recent virally popular dances like the Nae Nae and the Cooking Dance have found some measure of mainstream traction, thanks in large part to professional athletes.

Over the summer, two such crazes have taken off from two opposite coasts. At the end of June, 20-year-old rapper Bobby Shmurda blew up out of East Flatbush, Brooklyn, to dominate the rap zeitgeist with his song “Hot N–,” which gives an East Coast spin to Chicago drill music. He possesses the kind of ineffable rock star charisma that makes him captivating even when he turns his back to his audience (showing shades of Jim Morrison). In the video, he deploys a move called the Shmoney Dance, which his GS9 crew co-hort Rowdy Rebbel first introduced to the world through its titular song back in February (though few noticed at the time). Since then, Shmurda has signed a deal with Epic Records, made a rather enthusiastic fan of Lil Wayne, and turned the Shmoney Dance into the latest celebrity fad.


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Maddie and Tae give Nashville a shakeup with 'Girl in a Country Song'

Ever notice how every country song on the radio kind of sounds the same? So did Maddie Marlow and Tae Dye, a teenage country duo who are currently storming up the charts with the single “Girl in a Country Song.” Built around the same drum-loop-kissed, honky-tonk hop that dominates the country airwaves, Maddie and Tae stick it to all the clichés that drive the problematic subset of the mainstream Nashville sound dubbed “bro country.”

“We were going into a songwriting session one day, and we had just been in the car listening to country radio like we do every single day, because we love these songs and we love these guys,” explains the 18-year-old Tae. “We were laughing, because all these lyrics were very similar, and there were a lot of clichés in them. So what we did was we made this checklist, and on the checklist it had bare feet, cutoffs, tanlines, tan legs, but the most important one is the girl.” READ FULL STORY

Watch Charli XCX slay 'I Want Candy'

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Between her assists on massive singles by Iggy Azalea (“Fancy”) and Icona Pop (“I Love It”) and her own chart-scaling single “Boom Clap,” Charli XCX has earned herself a well-deserved reputation as a go-to performer of potently exuberant, candy-colored pop songs. There are few songs in the modern pop songbook that fit that same description as well as “I Want Candy,” originally performed by an ad hoc group called the Strangeloves in 1965, but thoroughly owned by Bow Wow Wow since they recorded a cover in 1982. So it’s not unexpected that Charli covering “I Want Candy” would work out pretty well.

What is surprising is how raw and–to use a shudderingly uncool word–rocking it is. Charli has been touring in front of a crack power trio, and “I Want Candy” is a much better showcase for their skills than acoustic versions of “Boom Clap.” Their version is just a little too fast and just a little too loud, and it’s pretty ragged around the edges, which is to say pretty much the ideal way of tackling this particular song. (Thanks in part to the usual lack of practice time before promotional duties like covering songs for internet TV shows, probably.) If Charli ever decides pop stardom isn’t for her, she and her girls could probably find a home making noise on the DIY punk circuit without much trouble. READ FULL STORY

Radiohead drummer Philip Selway releases super-cool 'Coming Up for Air' video

Normally when the drummer for a rock band releases a solo record, there are exactly two kinds of people who care: the band’s most devoted fans, and the drummer’s closest family and friends. Given how proggy Radiohead’s gotten—and the fact that albums by drummers tend to be the most self-indulgent, “jazz odyssey” type of solo projects—it’s therefore a little surprising that “Coming Up for Air,” the lead single from drummer Philip Selway’s sophomore album, Weatherhouse, isn’t a six-part instrumental composition for gamelan in 5/18 time, or something. Instead, it’s a perfectly nice trip-hop-inflected pop song, with vocals and everything.

Just as cool as the song itself is its accompanying video, directed by the Spanish film collective NYSU. With its surreal imagery and overwhelming atmosphere of noirish paranoia, it’s like a collaboration between Rene Magritte and Alfred Hitchcock—albeit overlaid with the flattened look of a late-’70s cop show. READ FULL STORY

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