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Tag: Music Videos (71-80 of 734)

Lana Del Rey sends more mixed messages with 'Ultraviolence' video

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Lana Del Rey’s debut album, Born to Die, proved to be something of a feminist ink blot: To some observers, the aspects of traditional American ideals of feminine subservience she’d woven deeply into her personal aesthetic, as well as her frequent use of Kennedy-era cultural signifiers, were a postmodern statement about her independence as an artist and a person. Others took it all at face value and simply saw a woman embracing dangerously retrograde ideas about how a woman should act, appear, and express herself.

If nothing else, Ultraviolence has doubled down on this ambiguity with its running theme of submissive relationships with men, and nowhere else on the album does that come through as strongly as on the title song, with its lyrical juxtaposition of a woman who’s “blessed with beauty and rage” and a lover who she calls her “cult leader,” not to mention its prominent but ambiguous reference to the Crystal’s “He Hit Me and It Felt Like a Kiss.”

Its video pushes things even further, with Super 8 footage of Del Rey in a postwar wedding dress sucking on the cameraman’s thumb and kneeling at the altar of a seemingly abandoned chapel. Is it a commentary on outdated gender roles? Is she just playing nuptial dress-up? Is she maybe just trolling us at this point?

How did Samm Levine of 'Freaks and Geeks' end up in Ice Cube's 'Drop Girl' video?

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There’s a lot going on in the just-released music video for Ice Cube’s “Drop Girl,” the latest single from his forthcoming album Everythang’s Corrupt: The giant heads of Cube and his collaborators RedFoo and 2 Chainz, more than a few female derrieres, and… Wait, is that Neal from Freaks and Geeks?

That is in fact Samm Levine as the lead scientist handling research on ladies’ behinds. “The truth of the matter is that anyone who knows me in my personal life knows that finding the perfect booty is something I’m deeply concerned with and have been for years,” Levine tells EW. “I actually run a lab out of my basement. Everyone there is a volunteer, they come on their own volition. When they asked if they could shoot the music video there, I had no problem with it. It was really more of a documentary than anything else.” READ FULL STORY

Danny Trejo talks about starring in Train's 'Angel in Blue Jeans' video

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Danny Trejo is an American treasure. At age 70, the star of Machete and Machete Kills (and possibly a third installment entitled Machete Kills Again… in Space) still projects the same inimitable badass vibes he’s been bringing to the screen since he broke into the business with 1985’s Runaway Train.

Which keeps him in high demand. Along with his usual packed schedule of projects, he recently starred in the video for “Angel in Blue Jeans,” the folk-pop-inflected lead single from Train’s upcoming album, Bulletproof Picasso, which includes a truly uncanny moment where he lip-syncs lead singer Pat Monahan’s part.

Trejo, who’s as affable offscreen as he is intimidating when he’s in character, talked to EW about the experience.

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Pharrell and Miley Cyrus team up for puzzling 'Come Get It Bae' video

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Pharrell’s new video for “Come Get It Bae” brings up a lot of questions: Why does the video start out by stating “beauty has no expiration date,” only for the multiple dancers in the video to all look to be in their thirties or younger? Why is Pharrell filming the dancers? Shouldn’t he be singing?

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Watch El May's NYC-centric video for 'I Played a Role'

For the first video from her forthcoming sophomore album, The Other Person Is You, singer-songwriter Lara Meyerratken, aka El May, took to the streets of New York City with director Yaara Sumeruk. The Australian musician brought along a pair of headphones and an iPhone loaded with her bouncy, dancehall-infused single “I Played a Role” and captured the reactions of people on the street hearing the track for the first time. Like Meyerratken, the song and the video’s conceit are fun and more than a little cutesy without crossing over into full-blown twee quirkiness.

“The train scene was our dream come true,” Meyerratken, who resides in L.A., writes in an email. “We had imagined a best-case scenario, where our journey around the city over the two days coincided with some amazing subway dancers. At the end of the day, headed to our final locations, exhausted on the J train, we heard the famous call: ‘SHOW TIME!’ So we approached them… it turned out to be a real highlight!”

The Other Person Is You, which features contributions from indie rock royalty like the Vaselines’ Eugene Kelly and Britta Phillips and Dean Wareham from Luna, is out Aug. 26.

Video: Kasai Allstars' 'Yangye, The Evil Leopard'

Kasai Allstars are from the Kasai region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and as their name suggests, they’re something of a supergroup, with around 25 musicians drawn not only from six different bands but from five different ethnic groups that reside in the area, not all of which have historically gotten along. Their music not only bridges the gaps between their disparate musical cultures, but in the process of adapting parts for traditional acoustic instruments for modern electrified ones they link two distinct eras of African music.

Crammed Discs just released the group’s double album, Beware the Fetish, which offers not only a pleasurable crash course in Congolese folklore (it includes story-songs with evocative titles like “As They Walked Into the Forest On a Sunday, They Encountered Apes Dressed as Humans”) but a blend of hypnotic rhythms and peripatetic melodies that should appeal equally to fans of dance music and jazz. In the meantime, here’s the video for “Yangye, the Evil Leopard.”

 

Video: Cats make synthesizer jams for Self's 'Runaway'

Matt Mahaffey has been making synth-heavy pop music under the name Self for nearly 20 years while also freelancing for a diverse range of artists including Pink, Lupe Fiasco, and Beck. Next week he’ll release Super Fake Nice, his first new album since his 2005’s album Porno, Mint, & Grime. Since then the Internet has grown considerably, and so has its role in promoting new music.

Mahaffey’s obviously been paying attention. “I’ve always fancied myself a person who’s ahead of the curve,” he says, “and with this video, I really think that making videos of cats is going to catch fire on the internets. I wasn’t available to be at my own video shoot and I refuse to allow my band to have a moment in the sun without me so we hired this rad cat band that I’ve been a fan of for a while.” Who knows? Maybe this crazy idea of putting cute cat videos online will catch on.

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Video: Heaven's Jail premieres 'Suicide'

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Francesco Ferorelli grew up on rap and heavy metal, but as the primary songwriter for the group Heaven’s Jail he makes folk rock with a traditionalist bent and an attitude that recalls sardonic ’70s singer-songwriters like Kris Kristofferson and Loudon Wainwright III. The group’s latest, Ace Called Zero (out Aug. 26 on Heart Break Beat), was recorded last fall in Connecticut, with Matthew Houck (a.k.a. Phosphorescent) producing and Ben Greenberg of the Men engineering, making it kind of a super-session of Brooklyn roots rockers.

The first video from the album is for its second single, “Suicide.” It was directed by Curtis Wayne Millard, who’s who’s worked with The Head and The Heart, and its chilly visuals pair well with the song’s bare-bones arrangement. Ferorelli says, “This video was born in a moment of inspiration. We drove up to the woods to shoot the album cover and halfway through Curtis said ‘I think we might have a music video too,’ so he grabbed the Super 8 and just started filming. The weather was on our side providing thick rolling mist and drizzling rain, a couple feet of snow still covered the ground and night was approaching quickly. In several short enigmatic scenes he harnessed the fleeting spirit of the song and created an elegant visual companion.”

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'Brooklyn Girls' is the most hated song on the internet right now

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Two days after being posted to YouTube, singer-songwriter Catey Shaw’s “Brooklyn Girls” music video has started to go viral. Unfortunately for her, its virality so far seems limited to music critics who are hate-watching it in order to write mean things about it on Twitter.

The song itself is solidly crafted and deeply irritating, the kind that’ll get wedged on a loop in your head even though you don’t want it to. Its foundation is bouncy, anthemic synth-pop with some of the punky spark of Icona Pop’s “I Love It”–and like “I Love It,” it seems specifically designed to target groups of tipsy girls on dance floors. Shaw piles on indie folk signifiers like a highly affected, old-timey vocal inflection and an en masse “whoa whoa” backing vocal in the chorus. It’s an inspired combination in that both of those styles are very popular right now, and there’s definitely some overlap between their audiences. But for anyone who’s at all averse to indie folk, it’s like taking a serviceable but not particularly great sandwich and topping it with a blast of pepper spray to the eyes.

It’s not the music that’s driving the hate-fest online as much as the song’s lyrics and video, which manage to capture every bothersome quirk Brooklyn (or at least the more gentrified parts of it) has to offer. There’s a line about how “gritty” Brooklyn girls are, exemplified by the fact that they wear combat boots during the summer and ride the subway. There’s PBR and street art and bad skateboarding. There’s a guy with a beard and a septum piercing drinking a bottle of kombucha. (To the credit of Shaw and the director, there are also people of color, which is a small relief.)

Shaw herself is, predictably, a newcomer to the borough, having moved there from Virginia Beach. She’s also the type of recent emigre who will say something like, “The whole thing about a Brooklyn girl is that you don’t have to be from Brooklyn.” And she will say it with a ukulele sitting nearby and a bird sitting on her shoulder.

Noisey, who was unsurprisingly one of the first outlets on the story (no one calls out hipster Brooklyn like hipsters in Brooklyn), deemed Shaw “The Rebecca Black of Brooklyn Gentrification,” which is both a sick burn and a fairly accurate assessment of the arc of her popularity so far. But unlike “Friday,” it’s not hard to imagine “Brooklyn Girls” riding the momentum from all the snarky online commentary it’s generating and actually breaking with an audience, one that’s not made up of music critics or people who live in Brooklyn. (Although it’s almost guaranteed to be ironically played at a Bushwick DJ night by the weekend.) Shaw may represent everything that Brooklynites dislike about the idiosyncratic identity their city’s acquired over the past decade, but those are the exact things that people who don’t live in the city, but would like to, are attracted to. There are probably plenty of pop fans out there who live with mom and dad and dream about being a gritty Brooklyn resident who wears combat boots and plays the ukulele and dyes their tips—and “Brooklyn Girls” will probably become their anthem.

Shaw’s playing a record release party tomorrow night. It’s in Williamsburg, naturally.

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Video: Naomi Shelton & The Gospel Queens' soulful 'Sinner'

Naomi Shelton has been singing professionally for over five decades, beginning in the midst of the early-’60s soul-music explosion, where she was inspired by the likes of Wilson Pickett and Otis Redding, and later expanding into gospel. Since 1999, she’s been fronting the long-running vocal group the Queens, which has since been rechristened Naomi Shelton & the Gospel Queens.

Backed by a band that includes former side men for Pickett, Sam Cooke, and James Brown, Shelton and the Queens have just recorded their sophomore record for leading soul revivalists Daptone Records. Cold World walks the blurry line between gospel and classic R&B that artists and ideas have been crossing back and forth for ages, with a rich, warm-blooded sound that comes in part from having tracked the songs live to analog tape. Shelton’s voice remains an impressive instrument, and the pleading vocal part on the album’s lead single, “Sinner,” is an ideal setting to show it off.

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