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Tag: New Stuff (71-80 of 1155)

In the studio: Weezer discusses lyrics, the new album title, and Ric Ocasek

We’re still a few months away from the arrival of Weezer’s new album Everything Will Be Alright in the End, but you can get a good sense of what to expect by reading about EW‘s exclusive visit to the studio. I spent two days with the men of Weezer, and we had a ton of conversations both about the new album and about the stuff bands talk about between takes.

But of course there was not enough room to get all of the gems into the piece. If you’re hungry for more, here are a handful of awesome bits that were left on the cutting room floor. READ FULL STORY

Yung Flight releases debut video 'To the Top'

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Yung Flight is a 21-year-old rapper currently living in Northern Virginia. He has a new single called “To the Top” that gives a Southern twist to the current cloud rap wave and provides an excellent platform to show off his raspy, breathy flow and his willingness to take risks with rhyme schemes. It also has a sweet R&B-flavored hook. Flight’s still so new that that’s about all the information I have on him right now, aside from the fact that he’s working on his first mixtape.

In the video, he and his crew wander around New York City and do a lot of looking like they have plans to conquer it soonish. Judging by his first release, that doesn’t seem like an impossible goal.

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Bruce Springsteen debuts short film for 'Hunter of Invisible Game'

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To mark the end of his latest massive world tour, Bruce Springsteen just posted a thank-you message to fans on his website, along with a short film based around “Hunter of Invisible Game” from his most recent album, High Hopes. The Boss not only stars in the 10-plus-minute clip but co-directed it along with frequent collaborator Thom Zimny, who’s been working on Springsteen documentaries for over a decade.

The short revolves around Springsteen playing a grizzled loner in what seems to be some sort of post-apocalyptic world that’s reverted to a pre-20th-century technological level—or at least that’s what all the crumbling ruins and horse riding seem to suggest. (Think The Road but gauzily dreamy rather than relentlessly horrifying.) The folk-soul song gets expanded to fit the visual format with an extended instrumental intro arranged for synthesizer, strings, and, uh, wind chimes.

For a first-time effort it’s not too bad. If he ever gets tired of making records (doubtful) he could probably pull off a post-catastrophe cowboy flick. “Hunter” is streaming now at his site.

Blood Orange releases moody 'High Street' video

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Near the end of Blood Orange’s outstanding 2013 album Cupid Deluxe, the psychic tension that’s been building up over its course finally has a moment of release as project mastermind Dev Hynes veers sharply away from the retro-tinged funk that makes up most of the record. The result is “High Street,” a gentle, meditative ballad where he takes a secondary role providing hooks for British rapper Skepta’s verses.

Despite the novelty value of the its Parade-era-Prince-meets-UK-grime approach, it’s a subtle composition that finds a steady balance between its two sides. With Skepta’s introspective lyrics, Hynes’s echo-soaked vocals, and the weightless flourishes of piano and synth pads that prop it all up, it sounds like a song made for contemplative late-night walks.

Fittingly, its video is heavy on atmospheric shots of Hynes wandering the nocturnal streets of London, and it also features a visually impressive setup with Skepta rapping in front of an array of unmanned double-decker buses. While there are significantly fewer of Hynes’s fantastic dance moves in “High Street” than there were in Cupid Deluxe‘s first three videos, it’s still pretty great.

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The-Dream returns to form with 'Royalty - The Prequel'

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Last week, R&B god the-Dream released a video for his single “Black” that underlined the song’s triumphant political message–inspired by the life of Nelson Mandela–with a staged protest pulling together representatives from a diverse range of causes, from Ukrainian sovereignty to the epidemic of gun violence in Chicago. It was a remarkably solemn moment from a performer who’s biggest moment of mainstream exposure in recent memory was when he got clowned by Jay-Z for the outfit he wore to the Grammys.

At 7 p.m. last night, the-Dream that his cult of devotees know and love—the one who writes songs about things like buying women expensive handbags in order to get off the hook for doggish behavior or getting drunk on tequila and crashing an ex’s weddingcame bouncing giddily back with the surprise release of a free seven-song EP called Royalty – The Prequel. It is, thankfully, a far less serious record than “Black,” or even most of last year’s IV Play, which even his hardcore fans had a hard time finding much pleasure in.

The-Dream is an R&B artist, but he’s always had a rapper’s spirit, and Royalty is, on one level, a playful tribute to the rap music that he loves. “Pimp C Lives” transmutes Houston’s syrupy hip-hop sound into future soul with a chorus that shouts out the late UGK rapper. “Cold” samples Mobb Deep’s classic NYC thug anthem “Shook Ones, Pt. II.”  On “Outkast” he compares true love to the feeling he got from listening to Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik for the first time.

Getting to goof around and indulge his geekily obsessive rap-fan side is one of the benefits of the mixtape form. It also removes much of the pressure to produce radio hits, which seems to have begun having a detrimental effect on his work. Where IV Play feels constrained and lifeless, Royalty (and the free online album 1977 that he released in 2012 under his given name, Terius Nash) is vibrant and mischievous, the qualities that made his fans fall in love with him in the first place, and ones that help sink his hooks into you even when they’re not particularly sharp. Royalty‘s supposed to be the first release on a new “Designer and Culture Label” he’s starting called Contra Paris. Hopefully he won’t go back to a traditional label—he’s much better when he’s off his leash.

Video: UK dance duo Jungle's brand-new 'Time'

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The two lifelong friends who make up the core of the British dance music group Jungle—they expand to a seven-piece for shows—go by the initials “J” and “T” and have generally kept as low a profile as possible while simultaneously blowing up in the UK on a level that suggests they might be this year’s Disclosure.

On July 15, they’re releasing a self-titled debut album on XL. In preparation, they just released a video for the single “Time.” The song is a kaleidoscopic pileup of soul, disco, and house music with a deep groove, psychedelic flourishes, and transcendent falsetto vocals that suggest a futuristic rendition of the Bee Gees’ disco phase.

For the accompanying visual, they have two rather dapper older gentlemen engage in a very smooth dance-off.

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Video: Get hooked on Tunde Olaniran's 'Critical'

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While many of his contemporaries work to cultivate an air of mystery through secret identities and un-Google-able stage names, Tunde Olaniran is generating a more intriguingly ambiguous vibe with a fraction of the effort. A native of Flint, Michigan, better known as Detroit’s less quaint sibling, Olaniran works in the gaps between hip-hop, R&B, dance music, and punk, weaving together aggressive beats, noisy electronics, and an intuitive knack for melody into a seamless, surprisingly pop-friendly whole. His recent five-song EP Yung Archetype sounds like Yeezus as a soul record, or if The-Dream made a record with TV on the Radio.

Last week Olaniran released a video for the brooding, spacious Yung Archetype track “Critical,” which he wrote for a family member who was diagnosed with cancer. It’s an emotionally intense four-and-a-half-minute ride, but I’ve had it on heavy rotation nonetheless. Hit the jump to get hooked. READ FULL STORY

The-Dream gives 'Black' the full video treatment

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Back in April, R&B king the-Dream released a new song, “Black,” that traded in his usual strip-club-friendly beats and bedroom-focused lyrics for anthemic sweep and a political message inspired by Nelson Mandela’s death. It was miles away from the Dream that so many of us know and love with a ridiculous, almost cultish avidity, but he managed to stick the tricky landing; “Black” is like one of R. Kelly’s patented Inspiration Jams without the shlockiness that those usually come with, or the creepy feeling that you’re getting life advice from a sexual predator.

“Black” launched with a lyric video cut together out of footage of political activism in progress, ranging from Tommie Smith and John Carlos giving the black power salute at the 1968 Olympics to Pussy Riot marching defiantly down a crowded Russian street. Today he dropped the song’s official video, which continues the political theme with an almost surreally broad coalition of protesters marching against racism, classism, homophobia, Wall Street, the Russian invasion of the Ukraine, violence in Chicago, and what seems like dozens of other causes. The video’s message may be a tad muddled (especially when you factor in the singer’s recent arrest on assault charges), but with the-Dream flexing a newfound ability to manipulate emotional switches beyond horniness and regret, it still hits. It’s probably not a coincidence that it’s dropping right before a day commemorating revolutionary political activity.

Watch the video below. (It may be NSFW because of brief female toplessness.)

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Nile Rodgers releases new song, 'Do What You Wanna Do'

The last couple of years have been very good to Nile Rodgers. The anti-disco sentiment that has long held back his reputation as a world-class musician, songwriter, and producer has finally started to fade away, and his work on Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories brought him back to a familiar spot on the top of the charts for the first time in years.

The Chic mastermind is continuing this hot streak with a new solo single. “Do What You Wanna Do” was recorded at last summer’s International Music Summit and auctioned off to benefit his We Are Family Foundation. The winner, Mark Brown, is owner of the dance music label Cr2 Records. He’s already issued a series of remixes by the likes of Moon Boots, and the label will finally release the original version of the track, which gives a modern-sounding makeover to Rodgers’s trademark uplifting disco vibe, on August 10. In the meantime, stream it below.

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Synthpop surrealists Baathhaus unveil the video for 'Ascension'

 Chicago quartet Baathhaus combines the transgressive glam surrealism of Lady Gaga with a synthpop sound redolent of vintage Erasure, New Order, and other popular acts at retro night at your local gay dance club. Over the past couple of years, they’ve started to accumulate the kind of cult following that an over-the-top theatrical pop band whose multimedia identity feels equally indebted to David Bowie and John Waters deserves, and as their audience has grown, their production values have increased to match.

Last week the group unveiled a new single, “Ascension,” on their SoundCloud, and now they’re ready to unveil the accompanying video. Unlike most Baathhaus productions, “Ascension” features no explosions of fake blood or glitter, but the band’s portrayal of a bourgeois suburban family and its teen daughter’s prom date is fraught with psychological tension. Member Dan Foley says, “The music video turns the lens on an everyday situation and shows us the dense and complex layers that can live inside of one simple moment. Longing, lust, anxiety, and the thrill of anticipation fill the quiet rooms of a suburban home and provide the perfect backdrop for the lush and shimmering pop of ‘Ascension.'”

Watch the exclusive video below.

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