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Tag: Pop (1-10 of 1075)

Diplo's new remix turns the lights on Lorde's 'Tennis Court'

Globetrotting DJ/super-producer Diplo was one of the first big artists to give Lorde a co-sign, and judging by their social media presences, the two have remained buddies throughout her rapid ascent into pop’s A-list. Today the two took their friendship to the next level with the release of “Diplo’s Andre Agassi Reebok Pump Mix” of “Tennis Court,” the opening track from Lorde’s breakthrough album Pure Heroine.

The original (currently at No. 78 on the Billboard Hot 100) juxtaposes huge vocal hooks, a gothy minimalist synthesizer arrangement, and some precociously over-it lyrics. Diplo being Diplo, his remix splashes neon light over Lorde’s brooding pop with pitch-bending keyboard arpeggios that candy ravers will go cuckoo over.













Salme Dahlstrom premieres 'Pop Ur Heart Out'

You may not recognize Salme Dahlstrom’s name, but it’s very likely that you’ve heard her song “C’mon Y’all” in a commercial (for everything from Special K to Subaru), a movie, a TV show, or a video game. Or you may have heard another song from her 2008 album The Acid Cowgirl Audio Trade somewhere, since she managed to license every single track on it, Moby-style.

The follow-up to Acid Cowgirl, titled Pop Propaganda Volume 2: Retro Funk Soul Junction, comes out September 16—and if the lead single, “Pop Ur Heart Out” is any indication, she won’t have problem selling these songs either. “Pop”—which Dahlstrom produced herself, like all her material—is relentlessly hooky and ridiculously accessible, with bits of hip-hop and dance music floating around in a matrix of straight sugar pop. Expect to see it in about a million more commercials.

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'Billboard' Hot 100 recap: Magic! unseats Iggy, 'All About That Bass' enters the summer jam competition

Over the course of the summer so far, the Hot 100′s been defined by its lack of movement. This week’s Top 10 is almost identical to last week’s, which was almost identical to the week before–four songs remain in the same positions, and the remaining six have only moved up or down by one or two slots.

These small changes can still produce significant drama. At the very top of the chart, Australian rapper Iggy Azalea’s seemingly unbeatable “Fancy” and Canadian faux-reggae group Magic!’s virally popular “Rude” have traded places, knocking “Fancy” out of the top spot and ending its record-setting seven weeks at number one. READ FULL STORY

'Brooklyn Girls' is the most hated song on the internet right now

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Two days after being posted to YouTube, singer-songwriter Catey Shaw’s “Brooklyn Girls” music video has started to go viral. Unfortunately for her, its virality so far seems limited to music critics who are hate-watching it in order to write mean things about it on Twitter.

The song itself is solidly crafted and deeply irritating, the kind that’ll get wedged on a loop in your head even though you don’t want it to. Its foundation is bouncy, anthemic synth-pop with some of the punky spark of Icona Pop’s “I Love It”–and like “I Love It,” it seems specifically designed to target groups of tipsy girls on dance floors. Shaw piles on indie folk signifiers like a highly affected, old-timey vocal inflection and an en masse “whoa whoa” backing vocal in the chorus. It’s an inspired combination in that both of those styles are very popular right now, and there’s definitely some overlap between their audiences. But for anyone who’s at all averse to indie folk, it’s like taking a serviceable but not particularly great sandwich and topping it with a blast of pepper spray to the eyes.

It’s not the music that’s driving the hate-fest online as much as the song’s lyrics and video, which manage to capture every bothersome quirk Brooklyn (or at least the more gentrified parts of it) has to offer. There’s a line about how “gritty” Brooklyn girls are, exemplified by the fact that they wear combat boots during the summer and ride the subway. There’s PBR and street art and bad skateboarding. There’s a guy with a beard and a septum piercing drinking a bottle of kombucha. (To the credit of Shaw and the director, there are also people of color, which is a small relief.)

Shaw herself is, predictably, a newcomer to the borough, having moved there from Virginia Beach. She’s also the type of recent emigre who will say something like, “The whole thing about a Brooklyn girl is that you don’t have to be from Brooklyn.” And she will say it with a ukulele sitting nearby and a bird sitting on her shoulder.

Noisey, who was unsurprisingly one of the first outlets on the story (no one calls out hipster Brooklyn like hipsters in Brooklyn), deemed Shaw “The Rebecca Black of Brooklyn Gentrification,” which is both a sick burn and a fairly accurate assessment of the arc of her popularity so far. But unlike “Friday,” it’s not hard to imagine “Brooklyn Girls” riding the momentum from all the snarky online commentary it’s generating and actually breaking with an audience, one that’s not made up of music critics or people who live in Brooklyn. (Although it’s almost guaranteed to be ironically played at a Bushwick DJ night by the weekend.) Shaw may represent everything that Brooklynites dislike about the idiosyncratic identity their city’s acquired over the past decade, but those are the exact things that people who don’t live in the city, but would like to, are attracted to. There are probably plenty of pop fans out there who live with mom and dad and dream about being a gritty Brooklyn resident who wears combat boots and plays the ukulele and dyes their tips—and “Brooklyn Girls” will probably become their anthem.

Shaw’s playing a record release party tomorrow night. It’s in Williamsburg, naturally.

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Blood Orange releases wonderfully sad remix of Sia's 'Chandelier'

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Dev Hynes, better known as avant-R&B genius Blood Orange, has been lying low since suffering a catastrophic apartment fire back in the winter. But he’s been starting to regain some of the momentum that last November’s Cupid Deluxe album had begun to generate. He’s been getting back to releasing his series of consistently entertaining videos for Cupid Deluxe tracks.

Now, he’s released a radically deconstructed remix of Sia’s summer jam “Chandelier” that strips the song of its triumphal arena rock swagger and, well, pretty much everything else, which he’s replaced with his own vocals, a twitchy drum part, and a tasteful thumb piano part. In the process he’s remade one of the most inspirational get-pumped anthems of the year into an anxiety-ridden slow jam, stripping Sia’s chorus from its surroundings to let it hang almost unadorned in a way that transmutes its YOLO-ness into something starkly desperate. It does the exact opposite of the original, but it’s just as compelling.

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Shawn Mendes talks about turning Internet fame into an IRL hit

A year ago, Pickering, Ontario native Shawn Mendes was just an average teenager with an interest in music. Then, last August, he posted a six-second clip of himself singing Justin Bieber’s “As Long As You Love Me” on the video-snippet-sharing service Vine. By the next day, he was an Internet star, thanks to the 10,000-plus followers he amassed overnight.

Now, he has nearly 3 million followers and has embarked on a more traditional musical career path, signing with Universal Music Group subsidiary Island Records. In late June he released his first single, “Life of the Party,” a piano-driven power ballad with an unexpectedly mature vibe that immediately went to the top of the iTunes singles chart.

Just after “Life of the Party” was released EW got on the phone with him to talk about Vine, YouTube, stage fright, and his sudden rise to fame.

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'Billboard' chart recap: The Hot 100 gets stuck

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 The Hot 100 this week is giving off a level of dèjá vu that’s (sorry) off the charts. The top six songs of this week are the exact same as the top six last week, with Iggy Azalea’s “Fancy,” which has been No. 1 for seven straight weeks, joining the Billboard record books for songs by female artists that have spent the longest in that spot. Below those, Calvin Harris’s “Summer” and John Legend’s “All of Me” traded spots at No. 7 and No. 8, and the rise of Maroon 5′s “Maps” from No. 13 to No. 9–knocking DJ Snake and Lil Jon’s “Turn Down for What” down one notch to No. 10–represents one of the biggest shakeups at the chart’s upper end.

The trend continues all the way down the chart. Ariana Grande’s Zedd-produced “Break Free” debuted at No. 15 and 5 Seconds of Summer’s “Amnesia” entered the chart one slot below, but below them a significant amount the change from last week was in increments of one or two places. The only drastic movement on the entire Hot 100 was Shawn Mendes’s “Life of the Party,” which dove from No. 24 to No. 82 in its second week on the chart. READ FULL STORY

Blood Orange releases moody 'High Street' video

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Near the end of Blood Orange’s outstanding 2013 album Cupid Deluxe, the psychic tension that’s been building up over its course finally has a moment of release as project mastermind Dev Hynes veers sharply away from the retro-tinged funk that makes up most of the record. The result is “High Street,” a gentle, meditative ballad where he takes a secondary role providing hooks for British rapper Skepta’s verses.

Despite the novelty value of the its Parade-era-Prince-meets-UK-grime approach, it’s a subtle composition that finds a steady balance between its two sides. With Skepta’s introspective lyrics, Hynes’s echo-soaked vocals, and the weightless flourishes of piano and synth pads that prop it all up, it sounds like a song made for contemplative late-night walks.

Fittingly, its video is heavy on atmospheric shots of Hynes wandering the nocturnal streets of London, and it also features a visually impressive setup with Skepta rapping in front of an array of unmanned double-decker buses. While there are significantly fewer of Hynes’s fantastic dance moves in “High Street” than there were in Cupid Deluxe‘s first three videos, it’s still pretty great.

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'Weezer Wednesday' premiere: New album gets a release date; EW goes in the studio

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Weezer have spent the bulk of 2014 working hard on a new album called Everything Will Be Alright In The End. They’ve been gradually letting fans in on the process of its creation through a video series they’ve dubbed “Weezer Wednesdays.” The clips have been teasing out not only bits of songs but also details about the album, including the title and the artwork.

EW is super-pleased to bring you the latest installment of “Weezer Wednesdays,” which not only reveals a snippet of a killer new song called “Return to Ithaca” but also confirms the release date for Everything Will Be Alright In The End. Weezer’s latest album will arrive on September 30.  READ FULL STORY

Bliss out to Jessie Ware's 'Tough Love' video

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A couple of weeks ago, British techno-chanteuse Jessie Ware released her first new music since her 2012 album Devotion. Produced by superstar beat-maker Benny Blanco (who’s done work for Rihanna and Katy Perry) and London “post-bass” producer Two Inch Punch, “Tough Love” has ethereal, Kate-Bush-esque vocals, a crisp, Prince-ly beat, and enough thick, delicious bass to satisfy the fans who came to her via electronic artists like SBTRKT and Joker. Now it also has a video that seamlessly translates the song’s gossamer vibes into visual form, which mainly means lots of shots of roses and lights and the very pretty Jessie Ware herself.

Ware hasn’t announced a title or a release date for her next album, but she’s revealed that the “Tough Love” producers (who collaborate under the name BenZel) will be executive producing, and teen-beloved cornball Ed Sheeran is also involved somehow. Despite the complete lack of verified information, it’s still sure to be one of the best pop moments of the year (assuming it comes out this year). READ FULL STORY

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