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Tag: Pop (1-10 of 1130)

Justin Timberlake's tour-ending shows to be filmed by Oscar-winning director

Justin Timberlake has announced the final tour dates of his “The 20/20 Experience World Tour,” and he’s enlisted some Oscar-worthy help to go out in style.

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Electropop chanteuse Chela channels vintage Madonna on 'Handful of Gold'

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EW recently reported that IHEARTCOMIX, stalwart pillar of the LA dance music community, is launching a new singles-only label called IHC 1NFINITY. Now we’ve got a first look at some of the music they’ll be releasing.

Its first release is by Australian electropop artist Chela, who’s previously recorded for the taste-making French record/fashion label Kitsuné. On previous releases, she’s offered a contemporary update of bouncy ’80s new wave from the brief era when synthesizers had come into the picture but the influence of UK punk and post-punk hadn’t quite taken over yet. Her new track, “Handful of Gold,” has a bigger beat and a bigger chorus than her earlier singles; the results make Chela sound almost spookily like Madonna back before she reached a superhuman level of fame, when she could still be caught kicking it at Danceteria. It’s an auspicious start for an audacious new venture.

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Museum of Love combines synthesizers, sculpture, and sadness on 'The Who's Who of Who Cares'

Like their DFA label mates, Museum of Love‘s Pat Mahoney and Dennis McNany make music that seems to come from an alternate universe where guitar-based rock ‘n’ roll died out in the late ’70s and was replaced by electronic musicians with analog gear and more delicately nuanced sensibilities who in the timeline we inhabit have been relegated to cult status. The first single from their brand new self-titled debut LP, the funky but vaguely bummed-out “The Who’s Who of Who Cares,” offers interlocking synthesizer patterns, an archly theatrical vocal melody, and plenty of horn and percussion embellishments.

Together, the combination sounds like a collaboration between Roxy Music, Arthur Russell, and the Salsoul Orchestra that was handed off to a Chicago house producer for remixing. For the video, Mahoney shows off the sculpting skills he developed in his pre-music career working for the toy industry to create a reproduction of McNany’s head which the then promptly destroys.

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Mary Lambert on moving on from Macklemore, crying with Madonna, and finding her own voice on her new album

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Not too long ago, Mary Lambert was tending bar in Seattle and following her muse as a spoken word artist in her spare time. A friend asked her to craft a hook for the independent hip-hop album he was working on—and then everything changed.

After the success of Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’s “Same Love,” Lambert found herself being courted by record labels, dueting with Madonna on stage at the Grammys, and moving to Los Angeles to record her full-length debut. READ FULL STORY

Bjork marks collaborator Mark Bell's death by posting his 'Possibly Maybe' remix

On Monday, EW reported that British electronic musician Mark Bell, a former member of the acclaimed British dance-music duo LFO and producer of seven Björk albums, died last week of complications from surgery. Bell wasn’t widely known outside dance music aficionados, but his work has echoed through pop music since he started working with Björk, beginning with her 1997 LP Homogenic, which borrowed ideas from drum ‘n’ bass, trip-hop, house, IDM, and other cutting-edge electronic styles of the time and wove them into an entirely new sound unto itself, a vigorous mutant hybrid that was both thoroughly pop-friendly and unabashedly avant-garde.

The influence of his work has only grown over the years, and has become especially noticeable in recent recordings by FKA TwigsBanks, and a legion of young artists looking to replicate Bell and Björk’s peculiar sonic alchemy.

In an apparent tribute to Bell, Björk’s posted to her SoundCloud his “Lucy remix” of “Possibly Maybe” from her album Post. Originally released in 1996 as one of several B-side remixes of the single, its boasts a syrupy beat, pitch-warped vocals, and a coating of amelodic tones that, nearly 20 years later, still sound ahead of their time.

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Stream Harriet Brown's intensely funky 'New Era' EP

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The music Aaron Valenzuela makes under the name Harriet Brown is stylistically miles away from what the club-kid image he affects might suggest—it has syncopated rhythms and loosely organic instrumentation rather than the four-on-the-floor beats and quantized MIDI tracks. He’s earned every single comparison to Prince that he’s accumulated during his still-young career, and much of his New Era EP has the confidently unhinged quality that helped define the Purple One’s late-’80s material, but it’s far from an exact replica. Like fellow pop auteur Blood Orange, he makes music that’s laced with nostalgia but not reliant upon it, drifting in an ambiguous timeframe somewhere between the near future and the recent past. More importantly, it’s just seriously really funky stuff.

New Era is out tomorrow on the Feel So Real label, but EW has an early look here.

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Lia Mice searches for a lost pet and finds electro bliss in her 'Our Heavy Heart' vid

Lia Mice is an exceptionally peripatetic artist, both geographically and artistically. She started out her music career in punk and soul bands in Australia, relocated to Brooklyn’s noise scene, and finally settled in France, where she now makes music that combines adventurous electronic sounds with a distinctly Gallic brand of clever pop songwriting in the lineage of Serge Gainsbourg and the French yé-yé artists of yore. Her album I Love You comes out Nov. 4 on Old Flame Records, and it’s full of sing-alongable melodies and sonic textures that are easy to lose yourself in. Her latest single, “Our Heavy Heart,” steers the current dream pop revival toward the dance floor with help from a clanging, echo-laden cowbell that almost manages to steal the show from Mice’s shimmering vocals. Its video alternates between shots of her on the street searching for a lost snake and shots of her and the snake dancing together in presumably happier times

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Teen-pop veteran Tinashe grows up and out on 'Aquarius'

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Aquarius, released this week, may be Tinashe’s first proper album, but she’s far from a rookie in the entertainment game. The 21-year-old singer got her start early as an actor, appearing in Robert Zemeckis’s CGI Christmas flick The Polar Express and the Bob Dylan-starring surrealist sci-fi project Masked and Anonymous before being recruited at age 14 to join a manufactured teen-pop group. That may not sound like a very auspicious start for a serious music career, but she says it was valuable nonetheless. “I think I learned a lot being in a situation where I wasn’t necessarily able to create music that was totally true to who I was or to present the person who I was,” she says over the phone from her home in Los Angeles.

If anything, her time in The Stunners helped give Tinashe a good idea of what she didn’t want to do when she struck out on her own. After the group split up in 2011 she started working on solo material in her home studio, sans record contract. “When you’re part a group,” she says, “it’s definitely a group effort, creatively. When I wasn’t signed to a record label I was free to make my own decisions. I definitely felt the need to create stuff on my own and just do things and make my own decisions and just put things out there. It was a really important step for me because it really opened the door so that now I have so much creative control in my art.”

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Swedish electro-poppers Kate Boy drop 'Open Fire'

In 2011 Kate Akhurst moved from Australia to Stockholm, Sweden in search of musical collaborators with more in common with her aesthetic vision than she could find at home. Producers Hampus Nordgren and Markus Dextegen seem to have fit the bill, bringing a quintessentially Swedish flavor to the electronic arrangements they bring to their group Kate Boy. “Open Fire,” from their upcoming debut LP, has all the sonic ambition of The Knife mixed with pop hooks worthy of Max Martin.

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The Voice's Michelle Chamuel returns with 'Face the Fire'

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Michelle Chamuel’s best known for her second-place finish on season four of The Voice. But she was already a fairly well-established independent musician before the show, and she’s continued to work steadily after, releasing EDM under the name Reverb Junkie. Despite her sizable catalog of work, her upcoming Face the Fire (due out next February on The End Records) is Chamuel’s first official solo album to be released under her own name.

The titular lead single promises good things for the full-length—with its big hooks, eccentric sounds, and spark-throwing energy, it sits somewhere between Taylor Swift and Le Tigre.

Chamuel writes in an email, “‘Face the Fire’ is about the innate desire in you to go for it and follow your passion. It can be daunting—but at some point you just start going after what you burn for. That’s facing the fire.” The song will be available for purchase tomorrow, Oct. 7, but you can hear it here first.

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