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Tag: Soundtracks (91-100 of 230)

'Sparkle' soundtrack listing: Whitney Houston's final recordings coming July 31

When Whitney Houston passed away on February 11, there were rumors that she had been working on new music for her own solo album. Since it seems as though said rumors are little more than hopeful speculation, for now we can only assume that the tracks recorded for the upcoming soundtrack to Sparkle will be her last recordings.

The soundtrack listing to Sparkle, which comes out on July 31 in advance of the film’s August 17 theatrical release date, features a total of 11 tracks, including a pair of Houston songs (the solo track “His Eye Is On the Sparrow” and the Jordin Sparks duet “Celebrate”) and a total of seven contributions from Sparks.

Check out the entirety of the soundtrack listing below.  READ FULL STORY

M83 set to score upcoming Tom Cruise movie 'Oblivion'

Two people on a roll right now: Tom Cruise and M83’s Anthony Gonzalez.

Cruise, whom you may remember from the widely loved Mission: Impossible Ghost Protocol will be starring in Oblivion, an upcoming sci-fi epic that will be scored by Gonzalez, also known as the French dude responsible for your favorite Victoria’s Secret commercial.

Director Joseph Kosinski (who also helmed 2010’s Daft Punk-scored Tron: Legacytold the Playlist that he “was listening to [Gonzalez's] music back in 2005 when I first wrote this story, so he was part of this from the very beginning in my mind, kind of creatively.”

Luckily, the synth-pop breakout was receptive to the idea of writing music for movies.

“I’m not afraid to do my first soundtrack on a big Hollywood movie, with a big budget and a lot of pressure,” he told the Playlist. “It’s a chance to create something big, and I’m ready for it.”

Continued Gonzalez, “This is a new adventure, so I’m going to push myself even harder and try to surprise people and move people with my music. My vision is really to have a combination of very electronic moments, very M83, and sometimes merge into something more soundtrack-y, but my kind of soundtracks.”

Sounds like good news for fans of the electro-phillic soundtrack of last year’s L.A. noir Drive!

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TV Jukebox Finale Edition! 'Desperate Housewives,' 'House,' 'Castle,' and more music-on-TV moments

The end has come, Jukeboxers! There’s an apocryphal story that the Inuit people have hundreds of words for snow. These past few weeks, we at Jukebox probably could have used about that many synonyms for cliffhanger. Between planes crashing, kidnappings, births, deaths, weddings, reunions, and dance parties, it’s been a groovy goodbye to the 2011-2012 TV season. Check out our picks below and make sure to click through to the final page to listen to a track-for-track Spotify playlist of these “show tunes.” (Warning for those still catching up on DVR: MAJOR SPOILERS ahead!) READ FULL STORY

In honor of 'Moonrise Kingdom,' listen to a playlist of our favorite Wes Anderson soundtrack songs

If you’ve already put on your finest camp gear and nonprescription black-framed eyeglasses, then you’re well aware that Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom — the director’s first live-action movie in five years — opens today. And you know what that means: a new Wes Anderson soundtrack!

By now, the filmmaker’s soundtracks have become more or less their own genre. Anderson is clearly a man of cultured (and very specific) tastes, and his curatorial chops shine on his soundtracks as brightly as they do in his obsessively detailed movies. The trailer for his latest, for instance, has Francois Hardy’s classic “Le Temps de l’Amour” basically woven into its DNA.

Yet the soundtrack to Kingdom, his seventh feature-length film, is the most unlike his previous ones. Anderson’s movies are usually supported by a mix of vinyl-era rock greats and British Invasion hipsters (think David Bowie, Love, the Rolling Stones, and especially the Kinks, which he originally wanted to be the only band soundtracking Rushmore) as well as Newport Folk Festival friendlies (such as Bob Dylan and Joan Baez), plus original compositions from Devo vet Mark Mothersbaugh. This time around, though, the music comes largely from composer Alexandre Desplat; after him, Hank Williams is the dominant force, with three songs.

Of course, a lot of this probably has to do with the movie being set in 1965, before most of his favorite go-tos were hitting their stride. But that doesn’t mean we’re any less excited — if anything, we’re all the more intrigued.

To get further amped for Anderson’s latest entry, we’ve combed through sixteen years of his soundtracks — from 1996’s Bottle Rocket to today’s Moonrise Kingdom — and put together our ultimate Wes Anderson playlist. Give it a spin below and let us know if you agree with our selections:

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Whitney Houston duets with Jordin Sparks for 'Sparkle' track: Hear it here

When Whitney Houston passed away back in February, she had already finished working on her final film Sparkle, a remake of a rags-to-riches flick from 1976 co-starring Jordin Sparks. That toil included Houston’s final new recordings, including the duet “Celebrate,” which just surfaced this morning.

Like all the music from Sparkle, this tag-team between Houston and Sparks was produced by R. Kelly, and his fingerprints are all over the bubbly backing track and unfussy arrangement.

Houston isn’t asked to do all that much, but the song drives home how authoritative her voice could still be and just how much Sparks’ approach owes to Whitney’s. Give “Celebrate” a spin below. READ FULL STORY

TV Jukebox: 'Make It Or Break It,' 'The Killing,' 'Person of Interest,' and more music-on-tv moments

Mother’s Day may be next weekend, but there’s no shortage of mama drama in the latest Jukebox. Mom’s got through (and even started) some trouble on shows including Make It Or Break It, Private Practice, Missing, and The Game.

Which isn’t to say the dads didn’t get in on the action, too, creating waves on The Killing, Revenge, and The Client List. The last few weeks also saw a steamy encounter (The Good Wife), a heartfelt tribute (Glee), and an ambush (Person of Interest), plus more music-on-TV moments from The L.A. ComplexGirls, and Mad Men.

Check out our picks below and make sure to click through to the final page to listen to a track-for-track Spotify playlist of this week’s “show tunes.” (Warning for those still catching up on DVR: SPOILERS ahead!)

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TV Jukebox: 'Don't Trust the B-- in Apartment 23,' 'Magic City,' 'Girls,' and more music-on-TV moments

Behind every great lady there’s a great man singing behind her — at least that was the case for most of this week’s Jukebox. In one instance, there was even a man singing as a lady (welcome back, Glee!). This week saw one particularly untrustworthy B—- in Apartment 23, a new slew of Girls, a masseuse with a heart of gold (The Client List), and a Scandal-ous Beltway fixer with brass… well, you get where I’m going. To paraphrase the great Aretha Franklin, sisters were doing it for themselves — with the help of artists as diverse as The Clash, Sleigh Bells, Paddy Casey, and Otis Redding, of course. Check out our picks below, and make sure to click through to the last page to listen to all the songs in our customized Spotify playlist. (Warning for those still catching up on DVR: SPOILERS ahead!) READ FULL STORY

Soundgarden's new 'Avengers' single 'Live to Rise' -- their first in 16 years -- available as free download today

The last time Soundgarden wrote and recorded a new song together, Bill Clinton was president and Independence Day was the top-grossing movie at the multiplex. (“Black Rain,” the “new” song from the band’s 2010 release Telephantasm, doesn’t count, since it dates all the way back to the Badmotorfinger era.)

But that was 1996. Since another relic from that year is suddenly walking around again, why wouldn’t the newly-revived Soundgarden get back together for a new single for the soundtrack to the all-superheroes-on-deck action flick The Avengers?

That very thing exists now. “Live to Rise” has been floating around the Internet for a minute, but now it has been officially released and will be available for free on iTunes starting today until next Tuesday, April 24.

So has anything changed in the 16 years between original Soundgarden compositions? READ FULL STORY

TV Jukebox: 'Mad Men,' 'Supernatural,' 'Missing,' and more music-on-TV moments

Old-school tracks were the name of the game more often than not these past few weeks. Whether your definition of “old-school” translates to proper Mad Men-era tunes heard on the AMC hit, Scandal, and Supernatural, or ’80s classics as seen on Happy Endings and One Tree Hill, this week’s Jukebox offers up a retro rave fit for anybody. Of course there were plenty of contemporary jams, too: MCs from London and the Bronx on Breakout KingsCSI: NY, and 90210, TV darlings Sleigh Bells on The Vampire Diaries, and Portland indie rockers Novosti on Missing, plus “show tunes” from GCB and Gossip Girl. Check out our picks below. (Warning for those still catching up on DVR: SPOILERS ahead!)

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What is the most '90s movie soundtrack of all time?

Last weekend, I stumbled across my new favorite blog on the Internet.

It’s written by a dude named Chris who is on an ongoing quest to decide which film released between 1990 and 1999 is the most ’90s movie of all time. He uses a handful of rotating criteria, like whether or not the plot of the film could be executed using today’s technology and social customs, the extreme ’90s-ness of the fashion, the use of outdated technology (like pagers and gigantic laptops), and whether the stars of the film are inextricably linked to the decade.

“The Quest” has been going on for a year, but I was so enamored of the idea that I ran through dozens of posts in a single afternoon, internally debating the merits of the scoring system and trying to decide whether or not Angelina Jolie is tethered to any particular era (and even if she isn’t, Hackers is still a paragon of ’90s-ness).

Top scoring entries so far include Don’t Tell Mom the Babysitter’s Dead (major points based on the impossibility of the plot in today’s technological landscape), Clueless (obvious nods to several different levels of fashion as well as the Mighty Mighty Bosstones), and Encino Man (a winner just based on the presence of Pauly Shore, perhaps the most ’90s a person has ever been).

That walk down memory lane appealed to me not only because I have so many personal memories tied up in movies like Happy Gilmore, Mallrats, and I Know What You Did Last Summer, but also because ’90s film soundtracks are about the only compact discs I still buy.

Whenever I’m in a used record store (especially in a city I’ve never visited), my first stop is always the soundtracks, where incredible relics like Twister and Batman Forever live in permanently unloved rotation. I’ve amassed a pretty thorough collection that acts as a remarkable summation of the times — especially the ones that were clearly curated to appeal to fans of the associated movies (and the ones that weren’t are even more mind-blowing).

So naturally, I started thinking: What ’90s movie soundtrack is the most ’90s? READ FULL STORY

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