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Tag: Stories Behind The Songs (1-3 of 3)

'Weird Al' Yankovic: The Stories Behind The Songs

For 35 years, “Weird Al” Yankovic has been music’s most reliable satirist, sending up the biggest pop hits and the most iconic artists for the sake of belly laughs. He’s about to release a brand new album called Mandatory Fun on July 15, so to prepare for a fresh batch of tunes we caught up with Yankovic to get the stories behind hits both big and small.  READ FULL STORY

Chris Cornell tells EW the stories behind classic 'Superunknown' songs -- EXCLUSIVE

Today marks the release of the deluxe 20th-anniversary edition of Soundgarden’s landmark 1994 album Superunknown.

The band celebrated the release of the two-disc (or five-disc, if you’re fancy) monster with a show at New York City’s Webster Hall last night—cleverly, tickets were $19.94—where they ran through the album top to bottom, with an encore of “Outshined” and “Rusty Cage” tossed in for good measure.

To properly celebrate one of the crowning achievements of the grunge era, EW caught up with Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell, who shared the stories behind some of the tracks from Superunknown.

Read on to find out how Pearl Jam’s Jeff Ament led the band to “Spoonman,: and exactly what the heck a “Black Hole Sun” really is (or not).  READ FULL STORY

Stories Behind the Songs: Brandon Flowers talks about the Killers' biggest hits

To celebrate the release of the Killers’ greatest-hits compilation, Direct Hits (out now), frontman Brandon Flowers told EW the tales behind some of the band’s best-known anthems.

“Mr. Brightside” (2003) 
“This was literally the first song that me and Dave [Keuning], our guitar player, wrote. We didn’t have a drummer yet but he gave me a cassette, and it had a few demos with complete songs of him singing, and then there would just be these riffs that he had — so he basically had the guitar for “Mr. Brightside,” and the pre-chorus. I had an idea already of this sort of monotone, linear delivery, and it just fit so well over his guitar line. So I slapped a chorus on it, and it was written pretty quickly.

I remember the first time I heard it [set] to a beat, it was a monumental experience. We wrote a lot of songs after that, but then the Strokes’ first record came out and we ditched everything we wrote except for that song and started 
again. [Laughs] Because that record’s so good, you know? It was just… we realized that they raised the bar. Whether the Strokes know it or not, they really changed our path.”

“Somebody Told Me” (2004) 
“We were going out to clubs a lot at the time. I think it speaks to a young man’s frustration, the difficulty of picking up girls. [Laughs] That’s probably where it stems from. I was just able to run with it, and the band supplied a wonderful backing track.”

“All These Things That I’ve Done” (2005) “I worked at a casino called the Gold Coast as a bellman. This was back when there weren’t cell phones yet, so I used to call the guys and tell them I was gonna call them back and leave an idea on their answering machines. I was very heavily into glam rock at the time, and I felt like [Lou Reed’s] Transformer and [David Bowie’s] Ziggy Stardust — the delivery of those records, sometimes it was almost talking to you, especially Lou. The lines ‘Help me out, yeah yeah, you gotta help me out/Don’t you put me on the back burner, you gotta help me out’? I was just trying to be Lou Reed funneled through the Las Vegas Strip. And the bass line is a direct rip-off of a Bowie track called ‘Slow Burn.’ I can say it now because I don’t think he’s gonna come after us.” READ FULL STORY

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