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Tag: Things That Are Loud (1-10 of 41)

AC/DC's Angus Young on the band's first show and why he needs teleportation technology

Next year, AC/DC will celebrate the 40th anniversary of its first album the only way the band knows how: With a new album, Rock or Bust, and a forthcoming world tour that promises to be as big and loud as the box office-busting trek they went on a few years back in support of 2008’s Black Ice.

Rock or Bust may be a high-octane, party-hard collection of monster jams, but the men of AC/DC are no strangers to real world adversity—be it the death of original singer Bon Scott, the health issues that have forced guitarist Malcolm Young to step away from the band, or the recent legal woes of drummer Phil Rudd. But none of that will deter AC/DC—especially lead guitarist Angus Young, who has four decades of rock and roll under his belt because he has stuck to his guns (and his signature schoolboy outfit). He sat down with EW to talk about the new album, the recent upheavals, and why he always keeps an eye on the sky during “Hell’s Bells.”

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Why fajitas sizzle and five more fun facts from the new book 'The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms The Way We Think, Feel, and Buy'

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Joel Beckerman is a master at sonic branding—the art of using not just music but all kinds of sounds to influence consumers. As the founder of Man Mad Music, he’s responsible for the company whose “sonic logos” include the four-tone signature that AT&T uses, the HBO original programming music, and the NBC Nightly News theme.

His new book The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms The Way We Think, Feel, and Buy (co-written with Edelman editorial director Tyler Gray)  is equal parts sociological study and business advice, using unique everyday examples– for instance, how the fate of the Chili’s fajita empire rested on the sound of the sizzling platter, and how Disneyland approaches soundscapes for a fully immersive experience–  to explain how sound effects our mood and shopping habits.

Below are five of the most fascinating case studies from the book:

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Meet Profound Lore Records founder Chris Bruni, the face of modern metal

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Next week sees the release of Foundations of Burden, the second album by Arkansas-bred doom metal band Pallbearer. Their first album, 2012’s Sorrow and Extinction, was a critically-beloved collection of heavy tunes that not only announced the arrival of a great act but also cemented Pallbearer’s label, Profound Lore Records, as the best source of new material for headbangers everywhere.

The 10-year-old label, based out of Kitchener, Ontario, has put out a staggeringly excellent series of releases by some of the best groups currently working in the extremely fertile metal underground. Just this year, Profound Lore has released stellar collections from Lord Mantis, the Atlas Moth, Alraune, Dead Congregation, and the Must List-approved Agalloch. Pallbearer comes out next week, with a new album by Witch Mountain not far behind. These bands dig deep into metal subgenres, conjuring up remarkable darkness via black metal, death metal, prog, hardcore, folk, and whatever else is available to get the turned-to-11 point across.

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Trent Reznor on Nine Inch Nails' tour with Soundgarden, getting paid at Woodstock, and hanging with Bowie

One of this summer’s biggest tours finds two rock titans sharing a single stage. Beginning July 19 in Las Vegas, Nine Inch Nails and Soundgarden will storm amphitheaters across North America delivering both classics (both Nine Inch Nails The Downward Spiral and Soundgarden’s Superunknown turned 20 this year) and new stuff (Nine Inch Nails put out Hesitation Marks last year; Soundgarden released King Animal, their first studio album in 16 years, back in 2012).

Nine Inch Nails mastermind Trent Reznor called in to EW from a tour stop in Finland to talk about holding grudges, retiring songs, and touring with David Bowie.

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Hear Tenacious D's cover of Dio's 'The Last In Line' -- EXCLUSIVE

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If a Mount Rushmore-style monument existed for metalheads, the late Ronnie James Dio would certainly be on it. As the frontman of Dio, Rainbow, and Black Sabbath (and a bunch of others), he’s more than earned his spot. And even if you don’t care much about smashes like “Holy Diver” or “The Mob Rules,” you have to give Dio credit for giving the world the metal horns.

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SXSW Friday: Soundgarden, Green Day, and the search for something loud

With Lady Gaga and her bucking vomitron in my rearview, my personal goal for Friday at SXSW was to find some good old-fashioned, turned-to-11 rawk. I had already seen a lot of about-to-break indie, a handful of promising rappers, and one gigantic intergalactic pop star. Now it was time to find some volume.

Anybody who has read my tweets or been forced to sit outside my office for months at a time under the auspices of “work experience” (sorry, interns!) knows that I like things fast and loud, which often means in extreme metal. But punk, garage rock, prog — these are all things that will satisfy my jones, and I was determined to seek out as many opportunities to permanently damage my hearing as I could find.

The day opened at Stubb’s at the Spin magazine party, a tradition that stretches back more than a decade. This year’s bill featured a fine cross-section of indie rock and fringe rap, with a lineup that included Future, Cloud Nothings, Against Me!, and Schoolboy Q. But my main concern was Radkey, a group made up of three brothers (ages 16, 18, and 20) who grind out delightfully unhinged punk tunes that also owe a healthy bit to Reagan-era thrash. It’s grim-sounding but well-executed, and as soon as their songwriting evolves even a tiny bit, they are going to be dangerous.  READ FULL STORY

Nine Inch Nails' 'The Downward Spiral': 20 years of filth and fury

Though I had dipped in and out of MTV throughout the late ’80s and early ’90s, tuning in for the manic kitsch of Remote Controlthe clever smarm of The Half-Hour Comedy Hour, and the occasional Skid Row video, I didn’t really go all in on the network—and thus music videos—until 1994. I had become deeply invested in the narrative running through the third season of The Real World, which was the great San Francisco-based slobberknocker between Pedro and Puck. That show became the only thing people talked about during middle school study halls, so I immersed myself in one of the earliest revolutionary reality shows, and often stuck around for the videos.

I have vivid memories of sitting in the dark in my living room after my parents had gone to bed, watching clip after clip on the network (this was still the era when a Saturday night meant several consecutive hours of music videos shown under various umbrellas). A handful of those videos from that year stuck with me, simply because they were in such heavy rotation: Nirvana’s Unplugged performance of “All Apologies,” Smashing Pumpkins’ sci-fi clip for “Rocket,”  Soudgarden’s terrifying “Black Hole Sun,” and the Beastie Boys’ kinetic ’70s cop show homage “Sabotage.” (There was also the always-playing clip for Janet Jackson’s “Any Time, Any Place,” which I found boring at the time but now I find cripplingly sexy.)

But only one video really mattered to me, and that was Nine Inch Nails’ “Closer.” READ FULL STORY

Motley Crue call it quits (again), announce gigantic farewell tour

They say there are only two retirements that never stick: Rock stars and professional wrestlers.

OK, nobody actually says that, but it’s more or less true. The call of the road and the brightness of the lights is often too much to keep aging stars away, which is why we’re still watching Ozzy Osbourne play Black Sabbath songs and Ric Flair deliver chops.

The latest band to declare retirement is Motley Crue, who just announced that they were hanging it up following a massive farewell tour that is scheduled to kick off July 2 and run on and off for the next two years. Dubbed The Final Tour, the trek is signed in blood (kind of): Earlier today in Los Angeles, the group — Vince Neil, Mick Mars, Nikki Sixx, and Tommy Lee — signed a formal “Cessation of Touring Agreement” that says they are officially forbidden from hitting the road as of the end of 2015. “Everything must come to an end,” Lee said at the press conference announcing the tour. “We always had a vision of going out with a big f—ing bang and not playing county fairs and clubs with one or two original band members. Our job here is done!”

Of course, this isn’t the first time Motley Crue have called it quits. READ FULL STORY

Best and Worst 2013: The six best metal albums of the year

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There’s a scene in the also-ran ’90s teen film Empire Records where one of the titular music store’s employees sorts through the CDs snatched by a just-caught shoplifter. The clerk is appalled that said juvenile criminal would only be jacking rap and metal and encourages him to listen to some jazz.

The passive suggestion in that scene is that obsession over those genres is best suited to 14-year-olds who haven’t yet grown out of their age of aggression. If that’s true, then I am undoubtedly regressing, as I spent roughly 79 percent of 2013 listening to fantastically guttural hip-hop and ultra-intense metal.

Luckily, metal’s constant shape-shifting and envelope-pushing provide a multitude of approaches and attitudes. The six albums listed below all fall under the heading of “metal,” but no two are the same. The only thing they share is a fundamental intensity that taps into something pure and primal. This year wasn’t as great a year as 2012, when stalwarts Baroness, Converge, High on Fire, and Gojira all hit remarkable peaks. But there was still plenty of shredding majesty and genuflections before darkness.

So enjoy my picks for the six (the most evil number) best metal albums of 2013. Apologies to Watain, Skeletonwitch, Kvelertak, Tombstoned, Amon Amarth, Ancient VVisdom, and Avatarium, all of whom made metal records I loved and just missed the cut for the top. Try ‘em all, and play ‘em loud.  READ FULL STORY

Enter Snowman: Metallica's next gig will be in Antarctica

Last month, Metallica crossed two more items off their collective bucket list when they released their first ever theatrical concert film and then headlined a show at the Apollo Theater in New York City. Now it seems they are going to hit a trifecta in 2013: The band announced yesterday that they will be playing a show in Antarctica.

“After over 30 years as a band, we have been unbelievably fortunate to visit just about every corner of the earth . . . except for one,” the group wrote on its official website. “That is all about to change as we are set travel to Antarctica, the only continent that Metallica has never played on until now!”

The show will be part of a contest through Coca-Cola Zero that is unfortunately only open to fans in a handful of Latin American countries (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Mexico) and will be the culmination of a week-long cruise. In addition to being staged on the Earth’s most desolate continent, it will also feature a new approach to performance that should make for some awesomely weird cell phone videos. “We’ll be playing inside a dome on the base and in another twist, the show will be transmitted to the audience via headphones with no amplification . . . a real first for us!” The show will also be streamed online, just in case you can’t go on a Metallica-themed cruise or don’t live in Costa Rica.

Metallica are no strangers to the cold—they headlined the extremely strange Molson Ice Polar Beach Party in 1995, which was held way up north in Canada.

The contest opens October 28, so if you’re in one of those above-mentioned countries, you can enter the contest here.

Here’s a question: What band would you literally go to the ends of the Earth to see?

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